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Age and sex relationship with flow-mediated dilation in healthy children and adolescents

Nicola D. Hopkins, Donald R. Dengel, Gareth Stratton Orcid Logo, Aaron S. Kelly, Julia Steinberger, Hanan Zavala, Kara Marlatt, Daniel Perry, Louise H. Naylor, Daniel J. Green

Journal of Applied Physiology, Volume: 119, Issue: 8, Pages: 926 - 933

Swansea University Author: Gareth Stratton Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a noninvasive technique used to measure conduit artery vascular function. Limited information is available on normative FMD values in healthy children and adolescents. The objective of this study was to assess relationships between age and sex with FMD across childhoo...

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Published in: Journal of Applied Physiology
ISSN: 8750-7587 1522-1601
Published: 2015
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa24601
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2020-07-06T14:41:11.9566663</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>24601</id><entry>2015-11-21</entry><title>Age and sex relationship with flow-mediated dilation in healthy children and adolescents</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-5618-0803</ORCID><firstname>Gareth</firstname><surname>Stratton</surname><name>Gareth Stratton</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2015-11-21</date><deptcode>STSC</deptcode><abstract>Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a noninvasive technique used to measure conduit artery vascular function. Limited information is available on normative FMD values in healthy children and adolescents. The objective of this study was to assess relationships between age and sex with FMD across childhood and adolescence. Nine hundred and seventy-eight asymptomatic children (12 &#xB1; 3 yr, range 6&#x2013;18 yr, 530 male) underwent ultrasonic brachial artery assessment before and after 5 min of forearm ischemia. Sex differences in FMD and baseline artery diameter were assessed using mixed linear models. Baseline artery diameter was smaller in females than males [2.96 mm (95% CI: 2.92&#x2013;3.00) vs. 3.24 mm (3.19&#x2013;3.28), P &amp;#60; 0.001] and increased with age across the cohort (P &amp;#60; 0.001). Diameter increased between ages 6 and 17 yr in males [from 2.81 mm (2.63, 3.00) to 3.91 mm (3.68, 4.14)] but plateaued at age 12 yr in females. Males had a lower FMD [7.62% (7.33&#x2013;7.91) vs. 8.31% (7.95&#x2013;8.66), P = 0.024], specifically at ages 17 and 18 yr. There was a significant effect of age on FMD (P = 0.023), with a reduction in FMD apparent postpuberty in males. In conclusion, the brachial artery increases structurally with age in both sexes; however, there are sex differences in the timing and rate of growth, in line with typical sex-specific adolescent growth patterns. Males have a lower FMD than females, and FMD appears to decline with age; however, these findings are driven by reductions in FMD as males near maturity. The use of age- and sex-specific FMD data may therefore not be pertinent in childhood and adolescence.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Applied Physiology</journal><volume>119</volume><journalNumber>8</journalNumber><paginationStart>926</paginationStart><paginationEnd>933</paginationEnd><publisher/><issnPrint>8750-7587</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1522-1601</issnElectronic><keywords/><publishedDay>15</publishedDay><publishedMonth>10</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2015</publishedYear><publishedDate>2015-10-15</publishedDate><doi>10.1152/japplphysiol.01113.2014</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2020-07-06T14:41:11.9566663</lastEdited><Created>2015-11-21T16:23:14.5256352</Created><path><level id="1">Faculty of Science and Engineering</level><level id="2">School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Nicola D.</firstname><surname>Hopkins</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Donald R.</firstname><surname>Dengel</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Gareth</firstname><surname>Stratton</surname><orcid>0000-0001-5618-0803</orcid><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Aaron S.</firstname><surname>Kelly</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Julia</firstname><surname>Steinberger</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Hanan</firstname><surname>Zavala</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Kara</firstname><surname>Marlatt</surname><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Daniel</firstname><surname>Perry</surname><order>8</order></author><author><firstname>Louise H.</firstname><surname>Naylor</surname><order>9</order></author><author><firstname>Daniel J.</firstname><surname>Green</surname><order>10</order></author></authors><documents/><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2020-07-06T14:41:11.9566663 v2 24601 2015-11-21 Age and sex relationship with flow-mediated dilation in healthy children and adolescents 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01 0000-0001-5618-0803 Gareth Stratton Gareth Stratton true false 2015-11-21 STSC Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a noninvasive technique used to measure conduit artery vascular function. Limited information is available on normative FMD values in healthy children and adolescents. The objective of this study was to assess relationships between age and sex with FMD across childhood and adolescence. Nine hundred and seventy-eight asymptomatic children (12 ± 3 yr, range 6–18 yr, 530 male) underwent ultrasonic brachial artery assessment before and after 5 min of forearm ischemia. Sex differences in FMD and baseline artery diameter were assessed using mixed linear models. Baseline artery diameter was smaller in females than males [2.96 mm (95% CI: 2.92–3.00) vs. 3.24 mm (3.19–3.28), P &#60; 0.001] and increased with age across the cohort (P &#60; 0.001). Diameter increased between ages 6 and 17 yr in males [from 2.81 mm (2.63, 3.00) to 3.91 mm (3.68, 4.14)] but plateaued at age 12 yr in females. Males had a lower FMD [7.62% (7.33–7.91) vs. 8.31% (7.95–8.66), P = 0.024], specifically at ages 17 and 18 yr. There was a significant effect of age on FMD (P = 0.023), with a reduction in FMD apparent postpuberty in males. In conclusion, the brachial artery increases structurally with age in both sexes; however, there are sex differences in the timing and rate of growth, in line with typical sex-specific adolescent growth patterns. Males have a lower FMD than females, and FMD appears to decline with age; however, these findings are driven by reductions in FMD as males near maturity. The use of age- and sex-specific FMD data may therefore not be pertinent in childhood and adolescence. Journal Article Journal of Applied Physiology 119 8 926 933 8750-7587 1522-1601 15 10 2015 2015-10-15 10.1152/japplphysiol.01113.2014 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2020-07-06T14:41:11.9566663 2015-11-21T16:23:14.5256352 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences Nicola D. Hopkins 1 Donald R. Dengel 2 Gareth Stratton 0000-0001-5618-0803 3 Aaron S. Kelly 4 Julia Steinberger 5 Hanan Zavala 6 Kara Marlatt 7 Daniel Perry 8 Louise H. Naylor 9 Daniel J. Green 10
title Age and sex relationship with flow-mediated dilation in healthy children and adolescents
spellingShingle Age and sex relationship with flow-mediated dilation in healthy children and adolescents
Gareth Stratton
title_short Age and sex relationship with flow-mediated dilation in healthy children and adolescents
title_full Age and sex relationship with flow-mediated dilation in healthy children and adolescents
title_fullStr Age and sex relationship with flow-mediated dilation in healthy children and adolescents
title_full_unstemmed Age and sex relationship with flow-mediated dilation in healthy children and adolescents
title_sort Age and sex relationship with flow-mediated dilation in healthy children and adolescents
author_id_str_mv 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01
author_id_fullname_str_mv 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01_***_Gareth Stratton
author Gareth Stratton
author2 Nicola D. Hopkins
Donald R. Dengel
Gareth Stratton
Aaron S. Kelly
Julia Steinberger
Hanan Zavala
Kara Marlatt
Daniel Perry
Louise H. Naylor
Daniel J. Green
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Applied Physiology
container_volume 119
container_issue 8
container_start_page 926
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
issn 8750-7587
1522-1601
doi_str_mv 10.1152/japplphysiol.01113.2014
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences
document_store_str 0
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description Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a noninvasive technique used to measure conduit artery vascular function. Limited information is available on normative FMD values in healthy children and adolescents. The objective of this study was to assess relationships between age and sex with FMD across childhood and adolescence. Nine hundred and seventy-eight asymptomatic children (12 ± 3 yr, range 6–18 yr, 530 male) underwent ultrasonic brachial artery assessment before and after 5 min of forearm ischemia. Sex differences in FMD and baseline artery diameter were assessed using mixed linear models. Baseline artery diameter was smaller in females than males [2.96 mm (95% CI: 2.92–3.00) vs. 3.24 mm (3.19–3.28), P &#60; 0.001] and increased with age across the cohort (P &#60; 0.001). Diameter increased between ages 6 and 17 yr in males [from 2.81 mm (2.63, 3.00) to 3.91 mm (3.68, 4.14)] but plateaued at age 12 yr in females. Males had a lower FMD [7.62% (7.33–7.91) vs. 8.31% (7.95–8.66), P = 0.024], specifically at ages 17 and 18 yr. There was a significant effect of age on FMD (P = 0.023), with a reduction in FMD apparent postpuberty in males. In conclusion, the brachial artery increases structurally with age in both sexes; however, there are sex differences in the timing and rate of growth, in line with typical sex-specific adolescent growth patterns. Males have a lower FMD than females, and FMD appears to decline with age; however, these findings are driven by reductions in FMD as males near maturity. The use of age- and sex-specific FMD data may therefore not be pertinent in childhood and adolescence.
published_date 2015-10-15T03:29:30Z
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