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Milk supply and breastfeeding decisions: the effects of new mothers’ experiences / Amy, Brown

NCT Perspectives, Volume: 29

Swansea University Author: Amy, Brown

Abstract

In the UK significant numbers of mothers stop breastfeeding in the early weeks, typically before they are ready, commonly citing poor milk supply. This review considers how the physiological issue of poor milk supply can often be explained by psychological, social and cultural factors rather than bi...

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Published in: NCT Perspectives
Published: 2015
Online Access: https://www.nct.org.uk/system/files/related_documents/Brown%20Milk%20supply%20and%20breastfeeding%20decisions.pdf
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa25036
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first_indexed 2015-12-12T01:56:14Z
last_indexed 2018-11-12T19:43:41Z
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spelling 2018-11-12T15:59:46.2610733 v2 25036 2015-12-11 Milk supply and breastfeeding decisions: the effects of new mothers’ experiences 37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3 0000-0002-0438-0157 Amy Brown Amy Brown true false 2015-12-11 HPP In the UK significant numbers of mothers stop breastfeeding in the early weeks, typically before they are ready, commonly citing poor milk supply. This review considers how the physiological issue of poor milk supply can often be explained by psychological, social and cultural factors rather than biological impediment. It unpicks how, whilst biological inability to breastfeed should affect a very small minority of women, considerable numbers of new mothers report insufficient breastmilk supply, ultimately leading to a decision to stop breastfeeding.This article aims to provide an overview of:• how breast milk supply is established;• the difference between primary physiological inability to breastfeed and poor milk supply as a result of feeding experience;• the layers of psychological, social, and cultural factors that affect milk supply and hence infant feeding decisions; and• messages for breastfeeding support. Other NCT Perspectives 29 8 12 2015 2015-12-08 https://www.nct.org.uk/system/files/related_documents/Brown%20Milk%20supply%20and%20breastfeeding%20decisions.pdf COLLEGE NANME Public Health, Policy and Social Sciences COLLEGE CODE HPP Swansea University 2018-11-12T15:59:46.2610733 2015-12-11T20:19:42.6327036 College of Human and Health Sciences Public Health and Policy Studies Amy Brown 0000-0002-0438-0157 1 0025036-03082016171611.pdf BrownMilksupplyandbreastfeedingdecisions.pdf 2016-08-03T17:16:11.0270000 Output 1992332 application/pdf Version of Record true 2016-08-03T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Milk supply and breastfeeding decisions: the effects of new mothers’ experiences
spellingShingle Milk supply and breastfeeding decisions: the effects of new mothers’ experiences
Amy, Brown
title_short Milk supply and breastfeeding decisions: the effects of new mothers’ experiences
title_full Milk supply and breastfeeding decisions: the effects of new mothers’ experiences
title_fullStr Milk supply and breastfeeding decisions: the effects of new mothers’ experiences
title_full_unstemmed Milk supply and breastfeeding decisions: the effects of new mothers’ experiences
title_sort Milk supply and breastfeeding decisions: the effects of new mothers’ experiences
author_id_str_mv 37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3
author_id_fullname_str_mv 37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3_***_Amy, Brown
author Amy, Brown
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publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
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hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
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department_str Public Health and Policy Studies{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Public Health and Policy Studies
url https://www.nct.org.uk/system/files/related_documents/Brown%20Milk%20supply%20and%20breastfeeding%20decisions.pdf
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description In the UK significant numbers of mothers stop breastfeeding in the early weeks, typically before they are ready, commonly citing poor milk supply. This review considers how the physiological issue of poor milk supply can often be explained by psychological, social and cultural factors rather than biological impediment. It unpicks how, whilst biological inability to breastfeed should affect a very small minority of women, considerable numbers of new mothers report insufficient breastmilk supply, ultimately leading to a decision to stop breastfeeding.This article aims to provide an overview of:• how breast milk supply is established;• the difference between primary physiological inability to breastfeed and poor milk supply as a result of feeding experience;• the layers of psychological, social, and cultural factors that affect milk supply and hence infant feeding decisions; and• messages for breastfeeding support.
published_date 2015-12-08T18:52:11Z
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