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Parental stress and coping in elite youth gymnastics: An interpretive phenomenological analysis

Naomi Burgess, Camilla Knight Orcid Logo, Stephen Mellalieu

Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health

Swansea University Author: Camilla Knight Orcid Logo

Abstract

Parents are essential in youth sport because they provide the emotional, informational, and financial support that enables their children to enjoy and succeed in their sporting endeavours. When providing such support, however, parents can experience a range of stressors from organisational, competit...

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Published in: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health
ISSN: 2159-676X 2159-6778
Published: 2016
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa25089
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first_indexed 2015-12-19T01:56:25Z
last_indexed 2019-09-22T13:33:08Z
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spelling 2019-09-22T10:31:25.4633328 v2 25089 2015-12-18 Parental stress and coping in elite youth gymnastics: An interpretive phenomenological analysis 6c81176f7e92c7c04ff6cfb8f1a0ed60 0000-0001-5806-6887 Camilla Knight Camilla Knight true false 2015-12-18 STSC Parents are essential in youth sport because they provide the emotional, informational, and financial support that enables their children to enjoy and succeed in their sporting endeavours. When providing such support, however, parents can experience a range of stressors from organisational, competitive, and developmental sources. This study sought to understand how parents of elite youth gymnasts cope within youth sport. Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used to facilitate an in-depth exploration of parents’ experiences. Seven parents of national and international level gymnasts aged 11–14 years participated in semi-structured interviews and data were analysed according to the guidelines set out by IPA. The results suggest that parents face numerous organisational, competitive, and developmental stressors in youth gymnastics including time and travel demands, child’s competition nerves, schooling, finances, and injury. Parents employed four categories of coping to manage these stressors: (a) detaching from gymnastics (e.g. by sharing parental tasks, relying on their children to cope, and maintaining balanced lifestyles); (b) normalising experiences (e.g. by recalling and comparing experiences); (c) willingness to learn (e.g. from others and from their own past experiences); and (d) managing emotional reactions (e.g. through emotional release, self-talk, distraction, and avoidance strategies). The findings suggest that parents’ stress experiences are dynamic and complex, with parents utilising different coping strategies to manage different stressors in different situations. Journal Article Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health 2159-676X 2159-6778 31 12 2016 2016-12-31 10.1080/2159676X.2015.1134633 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2019-09-22T10:31:25.4633328 2015-12-18T10:06:16.2643948 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences Naomi Burgess 1 Camilla Knight 0000-0001-5806-6887 2 Stephen Mellalieu 3 0025089-18122015101107.pdf QRSEHParentalStressandCopinginyouthgymnastics_FinalAcceptedmanuscriptv2.pdf 2015-12-18T10:11:07.3300000 Output 534416 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2017-01-27T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Parental stress and coping in elite youth gymnastics: An interpretive phenomenological analysis
spellingShingle Parental stress and coping in elite youth gymnastics: An interpretive phenomenological analysis
Camilla Knight
title_short Parental stress and coping in elite youth gymnastics: An interpretive phenomenological analysis
title_full Parental stress and coping in elite youth gymnastics: An interpretive phenomenological analysis
title_fullStr Parental stress and coping in elite youth gymnastics: An interpretive phenomenological analysis
title_full_unstemmed Parental stress and coping in elite youth gymnastics: An interpretive phenomenological analysis
title_sort Parental stress and coping in elite youth gymnastics: An interpretive phenomenological analysis
author_id_str_mv 6c81176f7e92c7c04ff6cfb8f1a0ed60
author_id_fullname_str_mv 6c81176f7e92c7c04ff6cfb8f1a0ed60_***_Camilla Knight
author Camilla Knight
author2 Naomi Burgess
Camilla Knight
Stephen Mellalieu
format Journal article
container_title Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
issn 2159-676X
2159-6778
doi_str_mv 10.1080/2159676X.2015.1134633
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences
document_store_str 1
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description Parents are essential in youth sport because they provide the emotional, informational, and financial support that enables their children to enjoy and succeed in their sporting endeavours. When providing such support, however, parents can experience a range of stressors from organisational, competitive, and developmental sources. This study sought to understand how parents of elite youth gymnasts cope within youth sport. Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used to facilitate an in-depth exploration of parents’ experiences. Seven parents of national and international level gymnasts aged 11–14 years participated in semi-structured interviews and data were analysed according to the guidelines set out by IPA. The results suggest that parents face numerous organisational, competitive, and developmental stressors in youth gymnastics including time and travel demands, child’s competition nerves, schooling, finances, and injury. Parents employed four categories of coping to manage these stressors: (a) detaching from gymnastics (e.g. by sharing parental tasks, relying on their children to cope, and maintaining balanced lifestyles); (b) normalising experiences (e.g. by recalling and comparing experiences); (c) willingness to learn (e.g. from others and from their own past experiences); and (d) managing emotional reactions (e.g. through emotional release, self-talk, distraction, and avoidance strategies). The findings suggest that parents’ stress experiences are dynamic and complex, with parents utilising different coping strategies to manage different stressors in different situations.
published_date 2016-12-31T03:30:50Z
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