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Transcranial modulation of brain oscillatory responses: A concurrent tDCS–MEG investigation

Claire Hanley Orcid Logo, Krish D. Singh, David J. McGonigle

NeuroImage

Swansea University Author: Claire Hanley Orcid Logo

DOI (Published version): 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.12.021

Abstract

The physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are still largely unknown. To provide novel insight into the neurobiology of tDCS, stimulation was applied concurrently with Magnetoencephalography (MEG). This occurred while participants completed...

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Published in: NeuroImage
Published: 2016
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa25304
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first_indexed 2016-01-05T01:56:05Z
last_indexed 2020-12-09T03:35:58Z
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spelling 2020-12-08T13:31:20.5868534 v2 25304 2016-01-04 Transcranial modulation of brain oscillatory responses: A concurrent tDCS–MEG investigation 8a50e5bcfe0164091b248e4602789bd7 0000-0002-9520-8490 Claire Hanley Claire Hanley true false 2016-01-04 HPS The physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are still largely unknown. To provide novel insight into the neurobiology of tDCS, stimulation was applied concurrently with Magnetoencephalography (MEG). This occurred while participants completed a visuomotor task before, during and after stimulation. Motor beta band (15–30 Hz) and visual gamma band (30–80 Hz) responses were localised using Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry (SAM). The resulting evoked and induced brain oscillatory responses were analysed. A significant reduction of average power was observed in the visual gamma band for anodal compared to sham stimulation. The magnitude of motor evoked responses was also demonstrated to be modulated by anodal tDCS. These results highlight that MEG can be used to draw inferences on the cortical mechanisms of DC stimulation. Journal Article NeuroImage 15 10 2016 2016-10-15 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.12.021 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University 2020-12-08T13:31:20.5868534 2016-01-04T15:39:52.2574834 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Claire Hanley 0000-0002-9520-8490 1 Krish D. Singh 2 David J. McGonigle 3 0025304-412201630617PM.pdf Hanley_2015_tDCS_MEG.pdf 2016-04-12T15:06:17.2270000 Output 2190960 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2016-05-09T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Transcranial modulation of brain oscillatory responses: A concurrent tDCS–MEG investigation
spellingShingle Transcranial modulation of brain oscillatory responses: A concurrent tDCS–MEG investigation
Claire Hanley
title_short Transcranial modulation of brain oscillatory responses: A concurrent tDCS–MEG investigation
title_full Transcranial modulation of brain oscillatory responses: A concurrent tDCS–MEG investigation
title_fullStr Transcranial modulation of brain oscillatory responses: A concurrent tDCS–MEG investigation
title_full_unstemmed Transcranial modulation of brain oscillatory responses: A concurrent tDCS–MEG investigation
title_sort Transcranial modulation of brain oscillatory responses: A concurrent tDCS–MEG investigation
author_id_str_mv 8a50e5bcfe0164091b248e4602789bd7
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8a50e5bcfe0164091b248e4602789bd7_***_Claire Hanley
author Claire Hanley
author2 Claire Hanley
Krish D. Singh
David J. McGonigle
format Journal article
container_title NeuroImage
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.12.021
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
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description The physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are still largely unknown. To provide novel insight into the neurobiology of tDCS, stimulation was applied concurrently with Magnetoencephalography (MEG). This occurred while participants completed a visuomotor task before, during and after stimulation. Motor beta band (15–30 Hz) and visual gamma band (30–80 Hz) responses were localised using Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry (SAM). The resulting evoked and induced brain oscillatory responses were analysed. A significant reduction of average power was observed in the visual gamma band for anodal compared to sham stimulation. The magnitude of motor evoked responses was also demonstrated to be modulated by anodal tDCS. These results highlight that MEG can be used to draw inferences on the cortical mechanisms of DC stimulation.
published_date 2016-10-15T03:36:02Z
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