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'Wales Bird: Dylan Thomas and Charlie Parker'

Daniel Williams Orcid Logo

Dylan Thomas: A Centenary Celebration, Pages: 151 - 164

Swansea University Author: Daniel Williams Orcid Logo

Abstract

This chapter, drawing on evidence from a range of writers such as Kenneth Rexroth, Amiri Baraka and Al Young, explores the process by which Dylan Thomas and saxophonist Charlie Parker were mythologized in the 1950s. Both Parker and Thomas were imagined to be, and to some extent cultivated images of...

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Published in: Dylan Thomas: A Centenary Celebration
Published: London Bloomsbury 2014
Online Access: http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/dylan-thomas-9781472903099/
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa25482
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last_indexed 2018-02-09T05:06:24Z
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spelling 2017-11-20T19:20:58.8593710 v2 25482 2016-01-11 'Wales Bird: Dylan Thomas and Charlie Parker' 827c700e950aa7919de43dff2e494e85 0000-0002-8744-1479 Daniel Williams Daniel Williams true false 2016-01-11 AELC This chapter, drawing on evidence from a range of writers such as Kenneth Rexroth, Amiri Baraka and Al Young, explores the process by which Dylan Thomas and saxophonist Charlie Parker were mythologized in the 1950s. Both Parker and Thomas were imagined to be, and to some extent cultivated images of themselves, as wild bohemians, deceiving those ignorant of their meticulous working methods into believing that their art was a spontaneous outpouring. The writers of the 1950s Beat generation emphasized the spontaneity of Thomas and Parker’s art, as this supported their essentially romantic view of allegedly ‘marginal’ or ‘primitive peoples’. Book chapter Dylan Thomas: A Centenary Celebration 151 164 Bloomsbury London Dylan Thomas, Charlie Parker, Jazz, Primitivism, Ethnicity, Beats 1 9 2014 2014-09-01 http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/dylan-thomas-9781472903099/ COLLEGE NANME English Literature COLLEGE CODE AELC Swansea University 2017-11-20T19:20:58.8593710 2016-01-11T09:35:26.5988098 College of Arts and Humanities English Language and Literature Daniel Williams 0000-0002-8744-1479 1
title 'Wales Bird: Dylan Thomas and Charlie Parker'
spellingShingle 'Wales Bird: Dylan Thomas and Charlie Parker'
Daniel, Williams
title_short 'Wales Bird: Dylan Thomas and Charlie Parker'
title_full 'Wales Bird: Dylan Thomas and Charlie Parker'
title_fullStr 'Wales Bird: Dylan Thomas and Charlie Parker'
title_full_unstemmed 'Wales Bird: Dylan Thomas and Charlie Parker'
title_sort 'Wales Bird: Dylan Thomas and Charlie Parker'
author_id_str_mv 827c700e950aa7919de43dff2e494e85
author_id_fullname_str_mv 827c700e950aa7919de43dff2e494e85_***_Daniel, Williams_***_0000-0002-8744-1479
author Daniel, Williams
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container_title Dylan Thomas: A Centenary Celebration
container_start_page 151
publishDate 2014
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description This chapter, drawing on evidence from a range of writers such as Kenneth Rexroth, Amiri Baraka and Al Young, explores the process by which Dylan Thomas and saxophonist Charlie Parker were mythologized in the 1950s. Both Parker and Thomas were imagined to be, and to some extent cultivated images of themselves, as wild bohemians, deceiving those ignorant of their meticulous working methods into believing that their art was a spontaneous outpouring. The writers of the 1950s Beat generation emphasized the spontaneity of Thomas and Parker’s art, as this supported their essentially romantic view of allegedly ‘marginal’ or ‘primitive peoples’.
published_date 2014-09-01T03:42:30Z
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score 10.852431