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Journal article 752 views

Beyond invisibility. Uses of comparison in Welsh cultural nationalism

Daniel Williams Orcid Logo

Studies on National Movements, Volume: 2, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Daniel Williams Orcid Logo

Abstract

This article explores the uses made of comparison in transcending the alleged ‘invisibility’ of minorities. Beginning with the suggestive fact that African American Ralph Ellison began conceiving of his seminal novel Invisible Man while a merchant marine stationed in wartime Swansea, South Wales, th...

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Published in: Studies on National Movements
Published: 2015
Online Access: http://snm.nise.eu/index.php/studies/article/view/0208a
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa25485
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spelling 2016-08-16T14:18:22.6772386 v2 25485 2016-01-11 Beyond invisibility. Uses of comparison in Welsh cultural nationalism 827c700e950aa7919de43dff2e494e85 0000-0002-8744-1479 Daniel Williams Daniel Williams true false 2016-01-11 AELC This article explores the uses made of comparison in transcending the alleged ‘invisibility’ of minorities. Beginning with the suggestive fact that African American Ralph Ellison began conceiving of his seminal novel Invisible Man while a merchant marine stationed in wartime Swansea, South Wales, the article proceeds to explore the ways in which Welsh nationalist authors and thinkers have compared their plight to that of others. Emrys ap Iwan was one of the first to describe the Welsh experience in broadly colonial terms, and to lampoon English monolingualism in the mirror of European multilingualism. Saunders Lewis developed ap Iwan’s thinking by emphasizing the ways in which Wales had been cut off form its natural home in Europe by the development of the imperial British state. If some writers turned to Europe, others turned to the United Staes for comparative sources. Jon Dressel’s problematic comparison of Wales with the Southern States is discussed as an example of the dangerous implications of some comparisons. The article seeks to demonstrate that national visibility and invisibility can only emerge in relation to one another. Recognition - that is recognizing ‘the Other’ and being recognized by ‘an other’ - is where nationalism finds its cultural embodiment and expression. Journal Article Studies on National Movements 2 1 Nationalism, Wales, Identity, Ethnicity, Comparative Liaterature 23 12 2015 2015-12-23 http://snm.nise.eu/index.php/studies/article/view/0208a Special issue on Catalan and Welsh Nationalisms. COLLEGE NANME English Literature COLLEGE CODE AELC Swansea University 2016-08-16T14:18:22.6772386 2016-01-11T09:59:07.4871180 College of Arts and Humanities English Language and Literature Daniel Williams 0000-0002-8744-1479 1
title Beyond invisibility. Uses of comparison in Welsh cultural nationalism
spellingShingle Beyond invisibility. Uses of comparison in Welsh cultural nationalism
Daniel, Williams
title_short Beyond invisibility. Uses of comparison in Welsh cultural nationalism
title_full Beyond invisibility. Uses of comparison in Welsh cultural nationalism
title_fullStr Beyond invisibility. Uses of comparison in Welsh cultural nationalism
title_full_unstemmed Beyond invisibility. Uses of comparison in Welsh cultural nationalism
title_sort Beyond invisibility. Uses of comparison in Welsh cultural nationalism
author_id_str_mv 827c700e950aa7919de43dff2e494e85
author_id_fullname_str_mv 827c700e950aa7919de43dff2e494e85_***_Daniel, Williams_***_0000-0002-8744-1479
author Daniel, Williams
author2 Daniel Williams
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url http://snm.nise.eu/index.php/studies/article/view/0208a
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description This article explores the uses made of comparison in transcending the alleged ‘invisibility’ of minorities. Beginning with the suggestive fact that African American Ralph Ellison began conceiving of his seminal novel Invisible Man while a merchant marine stationed in wartime Swansea, South Wales, the article proceeds to explore the ways in which Welsh nationalist authors and thinkers have compared their plight to that of others. Emrys ap Iwan was one of the first to describe the Welsh experience in broadly colonial terms, and to lampoon English monolingualism in the mirror of European multilingualism. Saunders Lewis developed ap Iwan’s thinking by emphasizing the ways in which Wales had been cut off form its natural home in Europe by the development of the imperial British state. If some writers turned to Europe, others turned to the United Staes for comparative sources. Jon Dressel’s problematic comparison of Wales with the Southern States is discussed as an example of the dangerous implications of some comparisons. The article seeks to demonstrate that national visibility and invisibility can only emerge in relation to one another. Recognition - that is recognizing ‘the Other’ and being recognized by ‘an other’ - is where nationalism finds its cultural embodiment and expression.
published_date 2015-12-23T03:42:18Z
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