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Keeping Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans / Laura L. Wilkinson; Danielle Ferriday; Matthew L. Bosworth; Nicolas Godinot; Nathalie Martin; Peter J. Rogers; Jeffrey M. Brunstrom

PLOS ONE, Volume: 11, Issue: 2, Start page: e0147603

Swansea University Author: Wilkinson, Laura

DOI (Published version): 10.1371/journal.pone.0147603

Abstract

Deliberately eating at a slower pace promotes satiation and eating quickly has been associated with a higher body mass index. Therefore, understanding factors that affect eating rate should be given high priority. Eating rate is affected by the physical/textural properties of a food, by motivational...

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Published in: PLOS ONE
Published: 2016
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa26035
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spelling 2017-08-31T14:21:58Z v2 26035 2016-02-01 Keeping Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans Laura Wilkinson Laura Wilkinson true 0000-0002-8093-0843 false 07aeb47532af5a8421686d4f22f4a226 70245b5659b1efe21a4556c22f1c6323 UpDu+7BEtvcgjUPWYy5zlh8j7kl4zZwebz0wEHEQAUk= 2016-02-01 HPS Deliberately eating at a slower pace promotes satiation and eating quickly has been associated with a higher body mass index. Therefore, understanding factors that affect eating rate should be given high priority. Eating rate is affected by the physical/textural properties of a food, by motivational state, and by portion size and palatability. This study explored the prospect that eating rate is also influenced by a hitherto unexplored cognitive process that uses ongoing perceptual estimates of the volume of food remaining in a container to adjust intake during a meal. A 2 (amount seen; 300ml or 500ml) x 2 (amount eaten; 300ml or 500ml) between-subjects design was employed (10 participants in each condition). In two ‘congruent’ conditions, the same amount was seen at the outset and then subsequently consumed (300ml or 500ml). To dissociate visual feedback of portion size and actual amount consumed, food was covertly added or removed from a bowl using a peristaltic pump. This created two additional ‘incongruent’ conditions, in which 300ml was seen but 500ml was eaten or vice versa. We repeated these conditions using a savoury soup and a sweet dessert. Eating rate (ml per second) was assessed during lunch. After lunch we assessed fullness over a 60-minute period. In the congruent conditions, eating rate was unaffected by the actual volume of food that was consumed (300ml or 500ml). By contrast, we observed a marked difference across the incongruent conditions. Specifically, participants who saw 300ml but actually consumed 500ml ate at a faster rate than participants who saw 500ml but actually consumed 300ml. Participants were unaware that their portion size had been manipulated. Nevertheless, when it disappeared faster or slower than anticipated they adjusted their rate of eating accordingly. This suggests that the control of eating rate involves visual feedback and is not a simple reflexive response to orosensory stimulation Journal article PLOS ONE 11 2 e0147603 1 2 2016 2016-02-01 10.1371/journal.pone.0147603 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology CHHS HPS None 2017-08-31T14:21:58Z 2016-02-01T20:39:03Z College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Laura L. Wilkinson 1 Danielle Ferriday 2 Matthew L. Bosworth 3 Nicolas Godinot 4 Nathalie Martin 5 Peter J. Rogers 6 Jeffrey M. Brunstrom 7 0026035-18022016112737.pdf Wilkinsonetal2016.pdf 2016-02-18T11:27:37Z Output 524383 application/pdf VoR true Updated Copyright 01/03/2016 2016-02-18T00:00:00 true
title Keeping Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans
spellingShingle Keeping Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans
Wilkinson, Laura
title_short Keeping Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans
title_full Keeping Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans
title_fullStr Keeping Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans
title_full_unstemmed Keeping Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans
title_sort Keeping Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans
author_id_str_mv 07aeb47532af5a8421686d4f22f4a226
author_id_fullname_str_mv 07aeb47532af5a8421686d4f22f4a226_***_Wilkinson, Laura
author Wilkinson, Laura
author2 Laura L. Wilkinson
Danielle Ferriday
Matthew L. Bosworth
Nicolas Godinot
Nathalie Martin
Peter J. Rogers
Jeffrey M. Brunstrom
format Journal article
container_title PLOS ONE
container_volume 11
container_issue 2
container_start_page e0147603
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1371/journal.pone.0147603
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
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description Deliberately eating at a slower pace promotes satiation and eating quickly has been associated with a higher body mass index. Therefore, understanding factors that affect eating rate should be given high priority. Eating rate is affected by the physical/textural properties of a food, by motivational state, and by portion size and palatability. This study explored the prospect that eating rate is also influenced by a hitherto unexplored cognitive process that uses ongoing perceptual estimates of the volume of food remaining in a container to adjust intake during a meal. A 2 (amount seen; 300ml or 500ml) x 2 (amount eaten; 300ml or 500ml) between-subjects design was employed (10 participants in each condition). In two ‘congruent’ conditions, the same amount was seen at the outset and then subsequently consumed (300ml or 500ml). To dissociate visual feedback of portion size and actual amount consumed, food was covertly added or removed from a bowl using a peristaltic pump. This created two additional ‘incongruent’ conditions, in which 300ml was seen but 500ml was eaten or vice versa. We repeated these conditions using a savoury soup and a sweet dessert. Eating rate (ml per second) was assessed during lunch. After lunch we assessed fullness over a 60-minute period. In the congruent conditions, eating rate was unaffected by the actual volume of food that was consumed (300ml or 500ml). By contrast, we observed a marked difference across the incongruent conditions. Specifically, participants who saw 300ml but actually consumed 500ml ate at a faster rate than participants who saw 500ml but actually consumed 300ml. Participants were unaware that their portion size had been manipulated. Nevertheless, when it disappeared faster or slower than anticipated they adjusted their rate of eating accordingly. This suggests that the control of eating rate involves visual feedback and is not a simple reflexive response to orosensory stimulation
published_date 2016-02-01T12:28:01Z
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