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The influence of training and maturity status on girls’ responses to short-term, high-intensity upper- and lower-body exercise

Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo, Joanne R. Welsman, Andrew M. Jones

Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Volume: 36, Issue: 3, Pages: 344 - 352

Swansea University Author: Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

DOI (Published version): 10.1139/h11-019

Abstract

A maturational threshold has been suggested to be present in young peoples’ responses to exercise, with significant influences of training status only evidenced above this threshold. The presence of such a threshold has not been investigated for short term, high intensity exercise. To address this,...

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Published in: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
Published: 2011
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa26153
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Abstract: A maturational threshold has been suggested to be present in young peoples’ responses to exercise, with significant influences of training status only evidenced above this threshold. The presence of such a threshold has not been investigated for short term, high intensity exercise. To address this, we investigated the relationship between swim-training status and maturity on the power output, pulmonary gas exchange and metabolic responses to upper (UP) and lower body (LO) Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT). Girls at three stages of maturity: pre-pubertal (Pre: 8 trained (T) 10 untrained (UT)); pubertal (Pub: 9 T, 15 UT); and post-pubertal (Post: 8 T, 10 UT) participated. At all maturity stages, T exhibited higher peak power (PP) and mean power (MP) during UP (PP: Pre, T, 163±20 vs. UT, 124±29; Pub, T, 230±42 vs. UT, 173±41; Post, T, 245±41 vs. UT, 190±40 W; MP: Pre, T, 130±23 vs. UT, 85±26; Pub, T, 184±37 vs. UT, 123±38; Post, T, 200±30 vs. UT, 150±15 W; all P<0.05) but not LO exercise, whilst the fatigue index was significantly lower in T for both exercise modalities. Irrespective of maturity, the oxidative contribution, calculated by the area under the O2 response profile, was not influenced by training status. No interaction was evident between training status and maturity, with similar magnitudes of difference between T and UT at all three maturity stages. These results suggest there is no maturational threshold which must be surpassed for significant influences of training status to be manifest in the ‘anaerobic’ exercise performance of young girls.
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 3
Start Page: 344
End Page: 352