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A ‘new life’ story or ‘delaying the inevitable’? Exploring older people's narratives during exercise uptake

J. Hudson, M.C. Day, E.J. Oliver, Joanne Hudson Orcid Logo

Psychology of Sport and Exercise, Volume: 16, Pages: 112 - 120

Swansea University Author: Joanne Hudson Orcid Logo

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine narratives of ageing in a clinical population embarking on a physical activity/exercise programme, exploring if and how their narratives changed throughout their experiences. Method: Participants were six sedentary individuals aged between 78-89 y...

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Published in: Psychology of Sport and Exercise
ISSN: 1469-0292
Published: 2015
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa26208
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spelling 2020-07-28T14:19:31.5138764 v2 26208 2016-02-15 A ‘new life’ story or ‘delaying the inevitable’? Exploring older people's narratives during exercise uptake 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99 0000-0003-4732-8356 Joanne Hudson Joanne Hudson true false 2016-02-15 STSC Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine narratives of ageing in a clinical population embarking on a physical activity/exercise programme, exploring if and how their narratives changed throughout their experiences. Method: Participants were six sedentary individuals aged between 78-89 years who were enrolled on an exercise programme for older adults. During the course of the 32-week programme participants took part in multiple interviews focused on their attitudes towards physical activity and their physical self-perceptions and identity. A structural narrative analysis was used to focus on the progression of the plot outlined in each participant’s story.Results: Our results suggested the emergence of two comparative narratives, with each demonstrated in the stories told by three participants. The first narrative is one of decelerated decline, in which the exercise programme is assimilated or fitted into the existing life narrative, but little is made of the personal meaning of being active. In the second narrative, participation in exercise prompted participants to re-story their ageing narratives, changing from initially accepting the decline they associated with an ageing body, to the prospect of gaining some control. While this increased sense of control may intuitively seem positive, participants initially described a number of existential challenges and dilemmas as well as their resolution of these.Conclusion: Participants’ emergent stories highlighted that while older adults may perceive exercise positively, their existing narratives of decline may be resistant to change. Where changes do occur, it is important for health professionals to recognize the associated difficulties with gaining increased responsibility for health. Journal Article Psychology of Sport and Exercise 16 112 120 1469-0292 Physical activity, identity, qualitative, elderly 31 3 2015 2015-03-31 10.1016/j.psychsport.2014.09.004 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2014.09.004 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2020-07-28T14:19:31.5138764 2016-02-15T12:28:52.8978628 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences J. Hudson 1 M.C. Day 2 E.J. Oliver 3 Joanne Hudson 0000-0003-4732-8356 4 0026208-14032018135801.pdf 26208.pdf 2018-03-14T13:58:01.2330000 Output 338093 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2016-02-15T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title A ‘new life’ story or ‘delaying the inevitable’? Exploring older people's narratives during exercise uptake
spellingShingle A ‘new life’ story or ‘delaying the inevitable’? Exploring older people's narratives during exercise uptake
Joanne Hudson
title_short A ‘new life’ story or ‘delaying the inevitable’? Exploring older people's narratives during exercise uptake
title_full A ‘new life’ story or ‘delaying the inevitable’? Exploring older people's narratives during exercise uptake
title_fullStr A ‘new life’ story or ‘delaying the inevitable’? Exploring older people's narratives during exercise uptake
title_full_unstemmed A ‘new life’ story or ‘delaying the inevitable’? Exploring older people's narratives during exercise uptake
title_sort A ‘new life’ story or ‘delaying the inevitable’? Exploring older people's narratives during exercise uptake
author_id_str_mv 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99
author_id_fullname_str_mv 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99_***_Joanne Hudson
author Joanne Hudson
author2 J. Hudson
M.C. Day
E.J. Oliver
Joanne Hudson
format Journal article
container_title Psychology of Sport and Exercise
container_volume 16
container_start_page 112
publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
issn 1469-0292
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.psychsport.2014.09.004
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2014.09.004
document_store_str 1
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description Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine narratives of ageing in a clinical population embarking on a physical activity/exercise programme, exploring if and how their narratives changed throughout their experiences. Method: Participants were six sedentary individuals aged between 78-89 years who were enrolled on an exercise programme for older adults. During the course of the 32-week programme participants took part in multiple interviews focused on their attitudes towards physical activity and their physical self-perceptions and identity. A structural narrative analysis was used to focus on the progression of the plot outlined in each participant’s story.Results: Our results suggested the emergence of two comparative narratives, with each demonstrated in the stories told by three participants. The first narrative is one of decelerated decline, in which the exercise programme is assimilated or fitted into the existing life narrative, but little is made of the personal meaning of being active. In the second narrative, participation in exercise prompted participants to re-story their ageing narratives, changing from initially accepting the decline they associated with an ageing body, to the prospect of gaining some control. While this increased sense of control may intuitively seem positive, participants initially described a number of existential challenges and dilemmas as well as their resolution of these.Conclusion: Participants’ emergent stories highlighted that while older adults may perceive exercise positively, their existing narratives of decline may be resistant to change. Where changes do occur, it is important for health professionals to recognize the associated difficulties with gaining increased responsibility for health.
published_date 2015-03-31T03:30:31Z
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