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Processes of identity development and behaviour change in later life: exploring self-talk during physical activity uptake

E. J. OLIVER, J. HUDSON, L. THOMAS, Joanne Hudson Orcid Logo

Ageing and Society, Pages: 1 - 19

Swansea University Author: Joanne Hudson Orcid Logo

DOI (Published version): 10.1017/S0144686X15000410

Abstract

The benefits of exercise are well documented, nevertheless, physical activity (PA) decreases progressively with age, a trend exacerbated in those who have fallen. An important predictor of exercise behaviour is the extent to which motivation for exercise has been internalized into one’s identity, ho...

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Published in: Ageing and Society
Published: 2015
Online Access: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9776168&fileId=S0144686X15000410
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa26215
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spelling 2020-07-28T14:19:03.2604965 v2 26215 2016-02-15 Processes of identity development and behaviour change in later life: exploring self-talk during physical activity uptake 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99 0000-0003-4732-8356 Joanne Hudson Joanne Hudson true false 2016-02-15 STSC The benefits of exercise are well documented, nevertheless, physical activity (PA) decreases progressively with age, a trend exacerbated in those who have fallen. An important predictor of exercise behaviour is the extent to which motivation for exercise has been internalized into one’s identity, however, we know little about changing health behaviours in older people, with calls for longitudinal studies to aid understanding (e.g., Strachan, Brawley, Spink, & Glazebrook 2010). Grounded in self-determination theory (SDT: Deci & Ryan, 1985, 2000), the present study explored the role of self-talk in the process of identity change during the initial ten weeks of an exercise referral falls prevention programme. Six participants identified at risk of falling completed weekly measures of their PA-related cognition and identity; in-depth interviews were completed at course commencement and ten weeks later. During this initial phase of the behaviour change programme, participants developed stronger physical activity identities, with themes reflecting a transition from a physically-impaired and negative self to a more future-orientated, capable, and integrated self-identity. Concurrently, autonomy supportive and competence-reinforcing self-talk significantly increased, with nonsignificant increases and decreases in controlling and amotivational self-talk, respectively. The data suggest that self-talk may be usefully conceptualised as a process through which social messages are interpreted and internalised to integrate a new behaviour into one’s existing self-concept. Journal Article Ageing and Society 1 19 physical activity, motivation, self-talk, identity 15 6 2015 2015-06-15 10.1017/S0144686X15000410 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&amp;aid=9776168&amp;fileId=S0144686X15000410 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2020-07-28T14:19:03.2604965 2016-02-15T15:45:57.7532147 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences E. J. OLIVER 1 J. HUDSON 2 L. THOMAS 3 Joanne Hudson 0000-0003-4732-8356 4 0026215-14032018142046.pdf 26215.pdf 2018-03-14T14:20:46.2170000 Output 358550 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2016-02-15T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title Processes of identity development and behaviour change in later life: exploring self-talk during physical activity uptake
spellingShingle Processes of identity development and behaviour change in later life: exploring self-talk during physical activity uptake
Joanne Hudson
title_short Processes of identity development and behaviour change in later life: exploring self-talk during physical activity uptake
title_full Processes of identity development and behaviour change in later life: exploring self-talk during physical activity uptake
title_fullStr Processes of identity development and behaviour change in later life: exploring self-talk during physical activity uptake
title_full_unstemmed Processes of identity development and behaviour change in later life: exploring self-talk during physical activity uptake
title_sort Processes of identity development and behaviour change in later life: exploring self-talk during physical activity uptake
author_id_str_mv 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99
author_id_fullname_str_mv 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99_***_Joanne Hudson
author Joanne Hudson
author2 E. J. OLIVER
J. HUDSON
L. THOMAS
Joanne Hudson
format Journal article
container_title Ageing and Society
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publishDate 2015
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1017/S0144686X15000410
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences
url http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&amp;aid=9776168&amp;fileId=S0144686X15000410
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description The benefits of exercise are well documented, nevertheless, physical activity (PA) decreases progressively with age, a trend exacerbated in those who have fallen. An important predictor of exercise behaviour is the extent to which motivation for exercise has been internalized into one’s identity, however, we know little about changing health behaviours in older people, with calls for longitudinal studies to aid understanding (e.g., Strachan, Brawley, Spink, & Glazebrook 2010). Grounded in self-determination theory (SDT: Deci & Ryan, 1985, 2000), the present study explored the role of self-talk in the process of identity change during the initial ten weeks of an exercise referral falls prevention programme. Six participants identified at risk of falling completed weekly measures of their PA-related cognition and identity; in-depth interviews were completed at course commencement and ten weeks later. During this initial phase of the behaviour change programme, participants developed stronger physical activity identities, with themes reflecting a transition from a physically-impaired and negative self to a more future-orientated, capable, and integrated self-identity. Concurrently, autonomy supportive and competence-reinforcing self-talk significantly increased, with nonsignificant increases and decreases in controlling and amotivational self-talk, respectively. The data suggest that self-talk may be usefully conceptualised as a process through which social messages are interpreted and internalised to integrate a new behaviour into one’s existing self-concept.
published_date 2015-06-15T03:31:47Z
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