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Using Brief Cognitive Restructuring and Cognitive Defusion Techniques to Cope With Negative Thoughts / Paul, Bennett

Behavior Modification, Volume: 40, Issue: 3, Pages: 452 - 482

Swansea University Author: Paul, Bennett

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Abstract

Up to 90% of people experience some level of negative thoughts, which may, in some, lead to psychopathology. This study compared two theoretically contrasting approaches to changing these negative thoughts: cognitive restructuring and cognitive defusion. Over a 5-day period, participants used one of...

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Published in: Behavior Modification
ISSN: 0145-4455 1552-4167
Published: 2016
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa26651
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first_indexed 2016-03-03T01:58:33Z
last_indexed 2018-11-12T19:47:06Z
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spelling 2018-11-12T13:25:21.0427486 v2 26651 2016-03-02 Using Brief Cognitive Restructuring and Cognitive Defusion Techniques to Cope With Negative Thoughts 20803717bf274c582f30f80916c596d3 0000-0003-2252-6065 Paul Bennett Paul Bennett true false 2016-03-02 HPS Up to 90% of people experience some level of negative thoughts, which may, in some, lead to psychopathology. This study compared two theoretically contrasting approaches to changing these negative thoughts: cognitive restructuring and cognitive defusion. Over a 5-day period, participants used one of three approaches to try and manage a personally negative thought: restructuring, defusion, or a control strategy. Before and after the intervention, participants reported: (a) believability of the thought, (b) the discomfort associated with the thought, (c) negativity associated with the thought, and (d) their willingness to experience the thought. In addition, daily online diaries were used to measure; (i) the frequency of these intrusive negative thoughts and 10 other positive or negative self-statements, (ii) theirs ‘willingness’ to experience such thoughts, and (iv) self-report measures of mood and psychological flexibility. The defusion intervention lowered the believability of negative thoughts, increased comfort and willingness to have the target thought, and increased positive affect significantly more than the cognitive restructuring or the control condition. These findings support the potential for using defusion as a strategy for managing negative thoughts. Journal Article Behavior Modification 40 3 452 482 0145-4455 1552-4167 cognitive defusion, cognitive restructuting, belief strength, mood 1 5 2016 2016-05-01 10.1177/0145445515621488 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University 2018-11-12T13:25:21.0427486 2016-03-02T15:09:11.2297274 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Andreas Larsson 1 Nic Hooper 2 Lisa A. Osborne 3 Paul Bennett 0000-0003-2252-6065 4 Louise McHugh 5
title Using Brief Cognitive Restructuring and Cognitive Defusion Techniques to Cope With Negative Thoughts
spellingShingle Using Brief Cognitive Restructuring and Cognitive Defusion Techniques to Cope With Negative Thoughts
Paul, Bennett
title_short Using Brief Cognitive Restructuring and Cognitive Defusion Techniques to Cope With Negative Thoughts
title_full Using Brief Cognitive Restructuring and Cognitive Defusion Techniques to Cope With Negative Thoughts
title_fullStr Using Brief Cognitive Restructuring and Cognitive Defusion Techniques to Cope With Negative Thoughts
title_full_unstemmed Using Brief Cognitive Restructuring and Cognitive Defusion Techniques to Cope With Negative Thoughts
title_sort Using Brief Cognitive Restructuring and Cognitive Defusion Techniques to Cope With Negative Thoughts
author_id_str_mv 20803717bf274c582f30f80916c596d3
author_id_fullname_str_mv 20803717bf274c582f30f80916c596d3_***_Paul, Bennett
author Paul, Bennett
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container_title Behavior Modification
container_volume 40
container_issue 3
container_start_page 452
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
issn 0145-4455
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doi_str_mv 10.1177/0145445515621488
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
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description Up to 90% of people experience some level of negative thoughts, which may, in some, lead to psychopathology. This study compared two theoretically contrasting approaches to changing these negative thoughts: cognitive restructuring and cognitive defusion. Over a 5-day period, participants used one of three approaches to try and manage a personally negative thought: restructuring, defusion, or a control strategy. Before and after the intervention, participants reported: (a) believability of the thought, (b) the discomfort associated with the thought, (c) negativity associated with the thought, and (d) their willingness to experience the thought. In addition, daily online diaries were used to measure; (i) the frequency of these intrusive negative thoughts and 10 other positive or negative self-statements, (ii) theirs ‘willingness’ to experience such thoughts, and (iv) self-report measures of mood and psychological flexibility. The defusion intervention lowered the believability of negative thoughts, increased comfort and willingness to have the target thought, and increased positive affect significantly more than the cognitive restructuring or the control condition. These findings support the potential for using defusion as a strategy for managing negative thoughts.
published_date 2016-05-01T03:41:07Z
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