No Cover Image

Journal article 257 views 16 downloads

London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression / Matthew Frank Stevens

The Economic History Review, Volume: 69, Issue: 4, Pages: 1083 - 1107

Swansea University Author: Stevens, Matthew

DOI (Published version): 10.1111/ehr.12282

Abstract

Evidence of debts owed to Londoners, and contested before the royal Court of Common Pleas, allows an examination of the role of London creditors in the English depression of the fifteenth century and a reassessment of its causes. Here we examine four main issues. What is the nature of the Court of C...

Full description

Published in: The Economic History Review
Published: 2016
Online Access: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ehr.12282/pdf
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa27688
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2017-05-24T19:34:02Z
last_indexed 2019-03-12T19:22:43Z
id cronfa27688
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2019-03-12T16:29:06Z</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>27688</id><entry>2016-05-04</entry><title>London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression</title><alternativeTitle></alternativeTitle><author>Matthew Stevens</author><firstname>Matthew</firstname><surname>Stevens</surname><active>true</active><ORCID/><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent><sid>24e42c4652a3104d12bc7424d475408d</sid><email>f76fe15f6b6d702865d83efd18240498</email><emailaddr>y7f85WN3wGh/bI3AieJPfhXCE6Z9OGBXOD9D5JU4+T4=</emailaddr><date>2016-05-04</date><deptcode>AHIS</deptcode><abstract>Evidence of debts owed to Londoners, and contested before the royal Court of Common Pleas, allows an examination of the role of London creditors in the English depression of the fifteenth century and a reassessment of its causes. Here we examine four main issues. What is the nature of the Court of Common Pleas evidence (section I)? What were the three main forms of credit offered by Londoners &#x2013;unsecured cash loans, sales of goods on credit, and written instruments called bonds (section II)? What is yielded by decadal analysis of Londoners&#x2019; extension of credit in the fifteenth century &#x2013;making direct comparisons with Pamela Nightingale&#x2019;s published Statute Merchant and Staple data (section III)? What defines, in modern economic terms, the claim of so called &#x2018;monetarist&#x2019; historians that credit was actively withdrawn during the depression, and how is this verified by the actions of London creditors (section IV)? It is concluded that the records of the Court of Common Pleas provide the detailed evidence monetarist historians have previously lacked both to prove that Londoners actively withdrew credit during the fifteenth century and to demonstrate that they employed pure equilibrium credit rationing in order to do so.</abstract><type>Journal article</type><journal>The Economic History Review</journal><volume>69</volume><journalNumber>4</journalNumber><paginationStart>1083</paginationStart><paginationEnd>1107</paginationEnd><publisher></publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint/><issnElectronic/><keywords>Medieval, London, Economic history, credit</keywords><publishedDay>1</publishedDay><publishedMonth>4</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2016</publishedYear><publishedDate>2016-04-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1111/ehr.12282</doi><url>http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ehr.12282/pdf</url><notes>This is the peer reviewed accepted manuscript of "London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression" published in Economic History Review at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ehr.12282/epdf.</notes><college>College of Arts and Humanities</college><department>History</department><CollegeCode>CAAH</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>AHIS</DepartmentCode><institution/><researchGroup>None</researchGroup><supervisor/><sponsorsfunders/><grantnumber/><degreelevel/><degreename>None</degreename><lastEdited>2019-03-12T16:29:06Z</lastEdited><Created>2016-05-04T16:51:47Z</Created><path><level id="1">College of Arts and Humanities</level><level id="2">History</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Matthew Frank</firstname><surname>Stevens</surname><orcid>0000-0001-8646-951X</orcid><order>1</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0027688-02022018152745.pdf</filename><originalFilename>Submission-version-London-creditors-and-the-fifteenth-century-depression.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2018-02-02T15:27:45Z</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>504851</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>AM</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action>Updated Copyright</action><actionDate>02/02/2018</actionDate><embargoDate>2018-04-01T00:00:00</embargoDate><documentNotes/><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents></rfc1807>
spelling 2019-03-12T16:29:06Z v2 27688 2016-05-04 London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression Matthew Stevens Matthew Stevens true false 24e42c4652a3104d12bc7424d475408d f76fe15f6b6d702865d83efd18240498 y7f85WN3wGh/bI3AieJPfhXCE6Z9OGBXOD9D5JU4+T4= 2016-05-04 AHIS Evidence of debts owed to Londoners, and contested before the royal Court of Common Pleas, allows an examination of the role of London creditors in the English depression of the fifteenth century and a reassessment of its causes. Here we examine four main issues. What is the nature of the Court of Common Pleas evidence (section I)? What were the three main forms of credit offered by Londoners –unsecured cash loans, sales of goods on credit, and written instruments called bonds (section II)? What is yielded by decadal analysis of Londoners’ extension of credit in the fifteenth century –making direct comparisons with Pamela Nightingale’s published Statute Merchant and Staple data (section III)? What defines, in modern economic terms, the claim of so called ‘monetarist’ historians that credit was actively withdrawn during the depression, and how is this verified by the actions of London creditors (section IV)? It is concluded that the records of the Court of Common Pleas provide the detailed evidence monetarist historians have previously lacked both to prove that Londoners actively withdrew credit during the fifteenth century and to demonstrate that they employed pure equilibrium credit rationing in order to do so. Journal article The Economic History Review 69 4 1083 1107 Medieval, London, Economic history, credit 1 4 2016 2016-04-01 10.1111/ehr.12282 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ehr.12282/pdf This is the peer reviewed accepted manuscript of "London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression" published in Economic History Review at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ehr.12282/epdf. College of Arts and Humanities History CAAH AHIS None None 2019-03-12T16:29:06Z 2016-05-04T16:51:47Z College of Arts and Humanities History Matthew Frank Stevens 0000-0001-8646-951X 1 0027688-02022018152745.pdf Submission-version-London-creditors-and-the-fifteenth-century-depression.pdf 2018-02-02T15:27:45Z Output 504851 application/pdf AM true Updated Copyright 02/02/2018 2018-04-01T00:00:00 true eng
title London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression
spellingShingle London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression
Stevens, Matthew
title_short London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression
title_full London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression
title_fullStr London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression
title_full_unstemmed London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression
title_sort London creditors and the fifteenth-century depression
author_id_str_mv 24e42c4652a3104d12bc7424d475408d
author_id_fullname_str_mv 24e42c4652a3104d12bc7424d475408d_***_Stevens, Matthew
author Stevens, Matthew
author2 Matthew Frank Stevens
format Journal article
container_title The Economic History Review
container_volume 69
container_issue 4
container_start_page 1083
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1111/ehr.12282
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
department_str History{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}History
url http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ehr.12282/pdf
document_store_str 1
active_str 1
description Evidence of debts owed to Londoners, and contested before the royal Court of Common Pleas, allows an examination of the role of London creditors in the English depression of the fifteenth century and a reassessment of its causes. Here we examine four main issues. What is the nature of the Court of Common Pleas evidence (section I)? What were the three main forms of credit offered by Londoners –unsecured cash loans, sales of goods on credit, and written instruments called bonds (section II)? What is yielded by decadal analysis of Londoners’ extension of credit in the fifteenth century –making direct comparisons with Pamela Nightingale’s published Statute Merchant and Staple data (section III)? What defines, in modern economic terms, the claim of so called ‘monetarist’ historians that credit was actively withdrawn during the depression, and how is this verified by the actions of London creditors (section IV)? It is concluded that the records of the Court of Common Pleas provide the detailed evidence monetarist historians have previously lacked both to prove that Londoners actively withdrew credit during the fifteenth century and to demonstrate that they employed pure equilibrium credit rationing in order to do so.
published_date 2016-04-01T15:37:29Z
_version_ 1639679105274216448
score 10.917785