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“Seven Million Londoners, One London”: National and Urban Ideas of Community in the Aftermath of the 7 July 2005 Bombings in London / Angharad Closs Stephens

Alternatives: Global, Local, Political, Volume: 32, Issue: 2, Pages: 155 - 176

Swansea University Author: Angharad, Closs Stephens

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DOI (Published version): 10.1177/030437540703200201

Abstract

This article explores the different ideas of community circulating in the aftermath of the 7 July 2005 bombings in London. Specifically, it compares the idea of a community in unity with a more cosmopolitan, urban idea of community. While these two ideas seem to present sharply different responses,...

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Published in: Alternatives: Global, Local, Political
Published: 2007
Online Access: http://alt.sagepub.com/content/32/2/155.abstract
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa28137
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Abstract: This article explores the different ideas of community circulating in the aftermath of the 7 July 2005 bombings in London. Specifically, it compares the idea of a community in unity with a more cosmopolitan, urban idea of community. While these two ideas seem to present sharply different responses, the article questions the extent to which the cosmopolitan model offers an alternative to the nationalist idea of community. Drawing on various discussions about how ideas of community are produced through different understandings of time and origins, the article argues that in this specific case both the national and the cosmopolitan accounts of community worked according to a very similar logic, and therefore risked reproducing similar problems and exclusions. Consequently, the article suggests that the task of exploring alternative conceptions of community must involve greater sensitivity to the politics of time and other approaches to the politics of origins. This challenge is pursued through the motif of the city as a site expressing a different temporality and thus a different idea of community from that expressed in traditions of national belonging.
College: College of Science
Issue: 2
Start Page: 155
End Page: 176