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Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago

Nicole Esteban Orcid Logo, Jacques-Olivier Laloë, Jeanne A. Mortimer, Antenor N. Guzman, Graeme C. Hays

Scientific Reports, Volume: 6, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Nicole Esteban Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1038/srep20339

Abstract

Incubation temperatures at turtle nest depths and implications for hatchling sex ratios of hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting in the Chagos Archipelago, Western Indian Ocean are reported and compared to similar measurements at rookeries in the Atlan...

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Published in: Scientific Reports
ISSN: 2045-2322
Published: 2016
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa28773
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first_indexed 2016-06-09T03:21:36Z
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spelling 2019-08-30T10:09:08.0772551 v2 28773 2016-06-09 Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago fb2e760b83b4580e7445092982f1f319 0000-0003-4693-7221 Nicole Esteban Nicole Esteban true false 2016-06-09 SBI Incubation temperatures at turtle nest depths and implications for hatchling sex ratios of hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting in the Chagos Archipelago, Western Indian Ocean are reported and compared to similar measurements at rookeries in the Atlantic and Caribbean. During 2012-2014, temperature loggers were buried at depths and in beach zones representative of turtle nesting sites in Diego Garcia. Data collected for 12,546 days revealed seasonal and spatial patterns of sand temperature. Depth effects were minimal, perhaps modulated by shade from vegetation. Coolest and warmest temperatures were recorded in the sites heavily shaded in vegetation during the austral winter and in sites partially shaded in vegetation during summer respectively. Overall, sand temperatures were relatively cool during the nesting seasons of both species which would likely produce fairly balanced hatchling sex ratios of 53% and 63% male hatchlings, respectively, for hawksbill and green turtles. This result contrasts with the predominantly high female skew reported for offspring at most rookeries around the globe and highlights how local beach characteristics can drive incubation temperatures. Our evidence suggests that sites characterized by heavy shade associated with intact natural vegetation are likely to provide conditions suitable for male hatchling production in a warming world. Journal Article Scientific Reports 6 1 2045-2322 sea turtle, incubation temperature, climate change, Western Indian Ocean, critically endangered 31 12 2016 2016-12-31 10.1038/srep20339 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2019-08-30T10:09:08.0772551 2016-06-09T01:35:36.9152356 Nicole Esteban 0000-0003-4693-7221 1 Jacques-Olivier Laloë 2 Jeanne A. Mortimer 3 Antenor N. Guzman 4 Graeme C. Hays 5 0028773-02052019143147.pdf Esteban_Laloe_2016_ScientificReports.pdf 2019-05-02T14:31:47.5000000 Output 454011 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-05-02T00:00:00.0000000 Distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY-4.0) true eng
title Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago
spellingShingle Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago
Nicole Esteban
title_short Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago
title_full Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago
title_fullStr Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago
title_full_unstemmed Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago
title_sort Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago
author_id_str_mv fb2e760b83b4580e7445092982f1f319
author_id_fullname_str_mv fb2e760b83b4580e7445092982f1f319_***_Nicole Esteban
author Nicole Esteban
author2 Nicole Esteban
Jacques-Olivier Laloë
Jeanne A. Mortimer
Antenor N. Guzman
Graeme C. Hays
format Journal article
container_title Scientific Reports
container_volume 6
container_issue 1
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
issn 2045-2322
doi_str_mv 10.1038/srep20339
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Incubation temperatures at turtle nest depths and implications for hatchling sex ratios of hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting in the Chagos Archipelago, Western Indian Ocean are reported and compared to similar measurements at rookeries in the Atlantic and Caribbean. During 2012-2014, temperature loggers were buried at depths and in beach zones representative of turtle nesting sites in Diego Garcia. Data collected for 12,546 days revealed seasonal and spatial patterns of sand temperature. Depth effects were minimal, perhaps modulated by shade from vegetation. Coolest and warmest temperatures were recorded in the sites heavily shaded in vegetation during the austral winter and in sites partially shaded in vegetation during summer respectively. Overall, sand temperatures were relatively cool during the nesting seasons of both species which would likely produce fairly balanced hatchling sex ratios of 53% and 63% male hatchlings, respectively, for hawksbill and green turtles. This result contrasts with the predominantly high female skew reported for offspring at most rookeries around the globe and highlights how local beach characteristics can drive incubation temperatures. Our evidence suggests that sites characterized by heavy shade associated with intact natural vegetation are likely to provide conditions suitable for male hatchling production in a warming world.
published_date 2016-12-31T03:40:22Z
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