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Cyanobacterial metabolites as a source of sunscreens and moisturizers: a comparison with current synthetic compounds

Peyman Derikvand, Carole Llewellyn, Saul Purton

European Journal of Phycology, Volume: 52, Issue: 1, Pages: 43 - 56

Swansea University Author: Carole Llewellyn

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DOI (Published version): 10.1080/09670262.2016.1214882

Abstract

The recognition of the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation on the skin has led to the commercial development of inorganic and synthetic organic UV filters that can attenuate the negative effects of sunlight exposure. In addition, chemical moisturizers are extensively used in cosmetic products t...

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Published in: European Journal of Phycology
Published: Taylor and Francis 2016
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa28822
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first_indexed 2016-06-10T13:04:17Z
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spelling 2018-02-20T19:12:36.7146990 v2 28822 2016-06-10 Cyanobacterial metabolites as a source of sunscreens and moisturizers: a comparison with current synthetic compounds bcd94bda79ebf4c2c82d82dfb027a140 Carole Llewellyn Carole Llewellyn true false 2016-06-10 FGSEN The recognition of the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation on the skin has led to the commercial development of inorganic and synthetic organic UV filters that can attenuate the negative effects of sunlight exposure. In addition, chemical moisturizers are extensively used in cosmetic products to improve the ability of skin to retain water. Whilst these chemicals have clear beneficial qualities, they may also have adverse effects such as contact sensitivity, oestrogenicity and even tumorigenic effects on human skin. Furthermore, the accumulation of such chemicals in the aquatic environment could be potentially harmful. Consequently, there is interest in exploiting safer alternatives derived from biological sources, especially from photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria that have developed mechanisms for coping with high UV irradiation and desiccation. In order to overcome the detrimental effects of UV radiation, these microorganisms produce UV screening compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids and scytonemin, which are good candidates as alternatives to current synthetic UV filters. In addition, extracellular substances produced by some extremophilic species living in hyper-arid habitats have a high water retention capacity and could be used in cosmetic products as moisturizers. In this review, we present an overview of the literature describing the potential of cyanobacterial metabolites as an alternative source for sunscreens and moisturizers. Journal Article European Journal of Phycology 52 1 43 56 Taylor and Francis : extracellular polymeric substances, moisturizer, mycosporine-like amino acid, personal care products, scytonemin, sunscreen 20 12 2016 2016-12-20 10.1080/09670262.2016.1214882 Corresponding author COLLEGE NANME Science and Engineering - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGSEN Swansea University RCUK, BB/E01898X/1 2018-02-20T19:12:36.7146990 2016-06-10T11:59:11.9034696 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences Peyman Derikvand 1 Carole Llewellyn 2 Saul Purton 3 0028822-20122016174259.pdf 09670262.2016.pdf 2016-12-20T17:42:59.8330000 Output 1949879 application/pdf Version of Record true 2016-12-20T00:00:00.0000000 This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. true
title Cyanobacterial metabolites as a source of sunscreens and moisturizers: a comparison with current synthetic compounds
spellingShingle Cyanobacterial metabolites as a source of sunscreens and moisturizers: a comparison with current synthetic compounds
Carole Llewellyn
title_short Cyanobacterial metabolites as a source of sunscreens and moisturizers: a comparison with current synthetic compounds
title_full Cyanobacterial metabolites as a source of sunscreens and moisturizers: a comparison with current synthetic compounds
title_fullStr Cyanobacterial metabolites as a source of sunscreens and moisturizers: a comparison with current synthetic compounds
title_full_unstemmed Cyanobacterial metabolites as a source of sunscreens and moisturizers: a comparison with current synthetic compounds
title_sort Cyanobacterial metabolites as a source of sunscreens and moisturizers: a comparison with current synthetic compounds
author_id_str_mv bcd94bda79ebf4c2c82d82dfb027a140
author_id_fullname_str_mv bcd94bda79ebf4c2c82d82dfb027a140_***_Carole Llewellyn
author Carole Llewellyn
author2 Peyman Derikvand
Carole Llewellyn
Saul Purton
format Journal article
container_title European Journal of Phycology
container_volume 52
container_issue 1
container_start_page 43
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1080/09670262.2016.1214882
publisher Taylor and Francis
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences
document_store_str 1
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description The recognition of the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation on the skin has led to the commercial development of inorganic and synthetic organic UV filters that can attenuate the negative effects of sunlight exposure. In addition, chemical moisturizers are extensively used in cosmetic products to improve the ability of skin to retain water. Whilst these chemicals have clear beneficial qualities, they may also have adverse effects such as contact sensitivity, oestrogenicity and even tumorigenic effects on human skin. Furthermore, the accumulation of such chemicals in the aquatic environment could be potentially harmful. Consequently, there is interest in exploiting safer alternatives derived from biological sources, especially from photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria that have developed mechanisms for coping with high UV irradiation and desiccation. In order to overcome the detrimental effects of UV radiation, these microorganisms produce UV screening compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids and scytonemin, which are good candidates as alternatives to current synthetic UV filters. In addition, extracellular substances produced by some extremophilic species living in hyper-arid habitats have a high water retention capacity and could be used in cosmetic products as moisturizers. In this review, we present an overview of the literature describing the potential of cyanobacterial metabolites as an alternative source for sunscreens and moisturizers.
published_date 2016-12-20T03:34:00Z
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