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Is salivary cortisol moderating the relationship between salivary testosterone and hand-grip strength in healthy men? / Blair T. Crewther, Andrew Thomas, Steve Stewart-Williams, Liam P. Kilduff, Christian J. Cook, Liam Kilduff

European Journal of Sport Science, Volume: 17, Issue: 2, Pages: 188 - 194

Swansea University Authors: Andrew Thomas, Liam Kilduff

Abstract

This study examined the moderating effect of cortisol (C) on the relationship between testosterone (T) and hand-grip strength (HGS) in healthy young men. Sixty-five males were monitored for salivary T, C and HGS before and 15 min after a short bout (5 × 6-s trials) of sprint cycling exercise. Sprint...

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Published in: European Journal of Sport Science
ISSN: 1746-1391 1536-7290
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa29299
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spelling 2018-02-16T11:03:02.4548281 v2 29299 2016-07-28 Is salivary cortisol moderating the relationship between salivary testosterone and hand-grip strength in healthy men? a43308ae6d7f5b8d5ab0daff5b832a96 0000-0001-5251-7923 Andrew Thomas Andrew Thomas true false 972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98 0000-0001-9449-2293 Liam Kilduff Liam Kilduff true false 2016-07-28 HPS This study examined the moderating effect of cortisol (C) on the relationship between testosterone (T) and hand-grip strength (HGS) in healthy young men. Sixty-five males were monitored for salivary T, C and HGS before and 15 min after a short bout (5 × 6-s trials) of sprint cycling exercise. Sprint exercise promoted (p < .05) positive changes in T (6.1 ± 24.9%) and HGS (3.4 ± 7.5%), but a negative C response (−14.4 ± 33.1%). The T and C measures did not independently predict HGS, but a significant T × C interaction was found in relation to these outcomes. Further testing revealed that pre-test T and HGS were negatively associated (p < .05), but only in men with high C levels. The exercise changes in T and HGS were also negatively related in men with low C levels (p < .05), but no relationship was seen in men with high C levels. In summary, complex relationships between T and HGS emerged when considering C as a moderating variable. The pre-test combination of high C and low T levels favoured absolute HGS, whereas low pre-test C levels and a smaller T change were linked to larger HGS changes. These associations suggest that, in the current format, T is not necessarily anabolic to muscle strength in healthy young men. Such complexities could also explain some of the inconsistent T relationships with physical performance in lesser trained male populations. Journal Article European Journal of Sport Science 17 2 188 194 1746-1391 1536-7290 Testing, stress, endocrinology, performance 31 12 2017 2017-12-31 10.1080/17461391.2016.1220628 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University 2018-02-16T11:03:02.4548281 2016-07-28T16:09:33.1186154 College of Engineering Engineering Blair T. Crewther 1 Andrew Thomas 0000-0001-5251-7923 2 Steve Stewart-Williams 3 Liam&nbsp;P. Kilduff 4 Christian J. Cook 5 Liam Kilduff 0000-0001-9449-2293 6 0029299-28072016160959.pdf crewther2016.pdf 2016-07-28T16:09:59.4070000 Output 1208922 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2017-08-25T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Is salivary cortisol moderating the relationship between salivary testosterone and hand-grip strength in healthy men?
spellingShingle Is salivary cortisol moderating the relationship between salivary testosterone and hand-grip strength in healthy men?
Andrew, Thomas
Liam, Kilduff
title_short Is salivary cortisol moderating the relationship between salivary testosterone and hand-grip strength in healthy men?
title_full Is salivary cortisol moderating the relationship between salivary testosterone and hand-grip strength in healthy men?
title_fullStr Is salivary cortisol moderating the relationship between salivary testosterone and hand-grip strength in healthy men?
title_full_unstemmed Is salivary cortisol moderating the relationship between salivary testosterone and hand-grip strength in healthy men?
title_sort Is salivary cortisol moderating the relationship between salivary testosterone and hand-grip strength in healthy men?
author_id_str_mv a43308ae6d7f5b8d5ab0daff5b832a96
972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98
author_id_fullname_str_mv a43308ae6d7f5b8d5ab0daff5b832a96_***_Andrew, Thomas
972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98_***_Liam, Kilduff
author Andrew, Thomas
Liam, Kilduff
author2 Blair T. Crewther
Andrew Thomas
Steve Stewart-Williams
Liam&nbsp;P. Kilduff
Christian J. Cook
Liam Kilduff
format Journal article
container_title European Journal of Sport Science
container_volume 17
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publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 1746-1391
1536-7290
doi_str_mv 10.1080/17461391.2016.1220628
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
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description This study examined the moderating effect of cortisol (C) on the relationship between testosterone (T) and hand-grip strength (HGS) in healthy young men. Sixty-five males were monitored for salivary T, C and HGS before and 15 min after a short bout (5 × 6-s trials) of sprint cycling exercise. Sprint exercise promoted (p < .05) positive changes in T (6.1 ± 24.9%) and HGS (3.4 ± 7.5%), but a negative C response (−14.4 ± 33.1%). The T and C measures did not independently predict HGS, but a significant T × C interaction was found in relation to these outcomes. Further testing revealed that pre-test T and HGS were negatively associated (p < .05), but only in men with high C levels. The exercise changes in T and HGS were also negatively related in men with low C levels (p < .05), but no relationship was seen in men with high C levels. In summary, complex relationships between T and HGS emerged when considering C as a moderating variable. The pre-test combination of high C and low T levels favoured absolute HGS, whereas low pre-test C levels and a smaller T change were linked to larger HGS changes. These associations suggest that, in the current format, T is not necessarily anabolic to muscle strength in healthy young men. Such complexities could also explain some of the inconsistent T relationships with physical performance in lesser trained male populations.
published_date 2017-12-31T03:42:31Z
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