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MISSION POSSIBLE: USING UBIQUITOUS SOCIAL GOAL SHARING TECHNOLOGY TO PROMOTE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN CHILDREN / Kelly Mackintosh, Parisa Eslambolchilar

Movement, Health & Exercise, Volume: 5, Issue: 2, Pages: 1 - 15

Swansea University Authors: Kelly Mackintosh, Parisa Eslambolchilar

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DOI (Published version): 10.15282/mohe.v5i2.115

Abstract

The present study investigated the acceptability of a novel ubiquitous socialgoal-sharing intervention aimed at promoting physical activity (PA) in schoolchildren. Methods: Thirty children (18 boys; 10.1±0.3 years; 1.39±0.06 m; 19.85±4.03 kg·m-2) were randomly assigned to ten groups and provided wit...

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Published in: Movement, Health & Exercise
ISSN: 2231-9409
Published: 2016
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa29375
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Abstract: The present study investigated the acceptability of a novel ubiquitous socialgoal-sharing intervention aimed at promoting physical activity (PA) in schoolchildren. Methods: Thirty children (18 boys; 10.1±0.3 years; 1.39±0.06 m; 19.85±4.03 kg·m-2) were randomly assigned to ten groups and provided with Fitbit monitors. Video-clips describing mission-based activities were shown on iPads each week, for four consecutive weeks. An LED lighting-strip provided visual feedback on daily group PA levels. Three semistructured group interviews were conducted with 10 children (4 boys, 6 girls; n=2) and two teachers (n=1). Additionally, at baseline and post-intervention, seven-day accelerometry, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF; 20m shuttle run test), anthropometrics and physical selfperceptions were assessed. Data were analysed using a mixed “between-within" analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Children stated that peers were positive role models and provided encouragement to accomplish the missions. Teachers felt that children’s fitness, teamwork and problem-solving skills considerably improved. Statistical analyses revealed no significant intervention effect (p>0.05), though BMI and waist circumference, and CRF, decreased and increased, respectively. Conclusion: The integration of ubiquitous social goal-sharing technology in schools was well received by teachers and pupils. However, further studies integrating a larger sample size encompassing numerous schools, comparison groups and a longer intervention period with associated follow-up measurements, are warranted to ascertain the feasibility as a low-cost intervention to promote children’s PA levels.
Item Description: Open Access journal
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 2
Start Page: 1
End Page: 15