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Profiling movement quality and gait characteristics according to body-mass index in children (9–11 y) / Cain C.T. Clark; Claire Barnes; Mark Holton; Huw Summers; Gareth Stratton

Human Movement Science, Volume: 49, Pages: 291 - 300

Swansea University Authors: Claire, Barnes, Mark, Holton, Huw, Summers, Gareth, Stratton

DOI (Published version): 10.1016/j.humov.2016.08.003

Abstract

Obese children move less and with greater difficulty than their normal-weight counterparts. Whilst the effect of high BMI on cardiovascular fitness is well known, the effect on movement quality characteristics during a standardised fitness test has not been investigated. The aims of this study were,...

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Published in: Human Movement Science
Published: 2016
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa29588
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spelling 2016-10-03T16:11:28.8481251 v2 29588 2016-08-16 Profiling movement quality and gait characteristics according to body-mass index in children (9–11 y) 024232879fc13d5ceac584360af8742c 0000-0003-1031-7127 Claire Barnes Claire Barnes true false 0e1d89d0cc934a740dcd0a873aed178e 0000-0001-8834-3283 Mark Holton Mark Holton true false a61c15e220837ebfa52648c143769427 0000-0002-0898-5612 Huw Summers Huw Summers true false 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01 0000-0001-5618-0803 Gareth Stratton Gareth Stratton true false 2016-08-16 EEN Obese children move less and with greater difficulty than their normal-weight counterparts. Whilst the effect of high BMI on cardiovascular fitness is well known, the effect on movement quality characteristics during a standardised fitness test has not been investigated. The aims of this study were, to characterise the movement quality of children performing the multi-stage fitness test (MSFT), and, report how movement quality characteristics cluster according to weight status. One hundred and three children (10.3 ± 0.6 y, 1.42 ± 0.08 m, 37.8 ± 9.3 kg, BMI; 18.5 ± 3.3 kg m2) performed the MSFT whilst wearing an ankle mounted accelerometer. BMI groups were used to classify children as underweight (UW), normal weight (NW), overweight (OW) and obese (OB). Characteristics of movement were profiled using a clustering algorithm. Spearman’s rho was used to assess relationship with BMI group, and a Mann-Whitney U test was used to assess differences between BMI groups. Obese children had significantly lower spectral purity than every other group and significantly lower time to exhaustion (TTE) than UW and NW children (P < 0.05). BMI was clustered with stride profile and TTE with spectral purity. Significant negative correlations (P < 0.05) were found between BMI and TTE (r = −0.25), spectral purity (r = −0.24), integrated acceleration (r = −0.22), stride angle (r = −0.23) and stride variability (r = −0.22). This was the first study to report the spectral purity of children’s gait. Further analysis unveiled key performance characteristics that differed between BMI groups. These were (i) representative of children’s performance during the MSFT and, (ii) significantly negatively correlated with BMI. Journal Article Human Movement Science 49 291 300 31 10 2016 2016-10-31 10.1016/j.humov.2016.08.003 COLLEGE NANME Engineering COLLEGE CODE EEN Swansea University 2016-10-03T16:11:28.8481251 2016-08-16T14:18:25.6724928 College of Engineering Engineering Cain C.T. Clark 1 Claire Barnes 0000-0003-1031-7127 2 Mark Holton 0000-0001-8834-3283 3 Huw Summers 0000-0002-0898-5612 4 Gareth Stratton 0000-0001-5618-0803 5 0029588-16082016141949.pdf clark2016v5.pdf 2016-08-16T14:19:49.5070000 Output 876873 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-02-13T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Profiling movement quality and gait characteristics according to body-mass index in children (9–11 y)
spellingShingle Profiling movement quality and gait characteristics according to body-mass index in children (9–11 y)
Claire, Barnes
Mark, Holton
Huw, Summers
Gareth, Stratton
title_short Profiling movement quality and gait characteristics according to body-mass index in children (9–11 y)
title_full Profiling movement quality and gait characteristics according to body-mass index in children (9–11 y)
title_fullStr Profiling movement quality and gait characteristics according to body-mass index in children (9–11 y)
title_full_unstemmed Profiling movement quality and gait characteristics according to body-mass index in children (9–11 y)
title_sort Profiling movement quality and gait characteristics according to body-mass index in children (9–11 y)
author_id_str_mv 024232879fc13d5ceac584360af8742c
0e1d89d0cc934a740dcd0a873aed178e
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author_id_fullname_str_mv 024232879fc13d5ceac584360af8742c_***_Claire, Barnes
0e1d89d0cc934a740dcd0a873aed178e_***_Mark, Holton
a61c15e220837ebfa52648c143769427_***_Huw, Summers
6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01_***_Gareth, Stratton
author Claire, Barnes
Mark, Holton
Huw, Summers
Gareth, Stratton
author2 Cain C.T. Clark
Claire Barnes
Mark Holton
Huw Summers
Gareth Stratton
format Journal article
container_title Human Movement Science
container_volume 49
container_start_page 291
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.humov.2016.08.003
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
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description Obese children move less and with greater difficulty than their normal-weight counterparts. Whilst the effect of high BMI on cardiovascular fitness is well known, the effect on movement quality characteristics during a standardised fitness test has not been investigated. The aims of this study were, to characterise the movement quality of children performing the multi-stage fitness test (MSFT), and, report how movement quality characteristics cluster according to weight status. One hundred and three children (10.3 ± 0.6 y, 1.42 ± 0.08 m, 37.8 ± 9.3 kg, BMI; 18.5 ± 3.3 kg m2) performed the MSFT whilst wearing an ankle mounted accelerometer. BMI groups were used to classify children as underweight (UW), normal weight (NW), overweight (OW) and obese (OB). Characteristics of movement were profiled using a clustering algorithm. Spearman’s rho was used to assess relationship with BMI group, and a Mann-Whitney U test was used to assess differences between BMI groups. Obese children had significantly lower spectral purity than every other group and significantly lower time to exhaustion (TTE) than UW and NW children (P < 0.05). BMI was clustered with stride profile and TTE with spectral purity. Significant negative correlations (P < 0.05) were found between BMI and TTE (r = −0.25), spectral purity (r = −0.24), integrated acceleration (r = −0.22), stride angle (r = −0.23) and stride variability (r = −0.22). This was the first study to report the spectral purity of children’s gait. Further analysis unveiled key performance characteristics that differed between BMI groups. These were (i) representative of children’s performance during the MSFT and, (ii) significantly negatively correlated with BMI.
published_date 2016-10-31T03:40:55Z
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