No Cover Image

Book chapter 658 views

Visible prowess? Reading men's head and face wounds in early medieval Europe to 1000CE

Patricia Skinner Orcid Logo

Wounds and Wound Repair in Medieval Culture, ed. L. Tracy and K. de Vries, Pages: 81 - 101

Swansea University Author: Patricia Skinner Orcid Logo

Full text not available from this repository: check for access using links below.

DOI (Published version): 10.1163/9789004306455_005

Abstract

Although the historiography of medieval violence is now well-established, however, rather less attention has been paid to the fate of the wounded man in early medieval culture, particularly one suffering facial or head wounds of a disfiguring or disabling nature. Early medieval law codes, medical te...

Full description

Published in: Wounds and Wound Repair in Medieval Culture, ed. L. Tracy and K. de Vries
Published: Leiden Brill 2015
Online Access: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK332959/
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa30092
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Although the historiography of medieval violence is now well-established, however, rather less attention has been paid to the fate of the wounded man in early medieval culture, particularly one suffering facial or head wounds of a disfiguring or disabling nature. Early medieval law codes, medical texts, and written narratives (both historical and imaginary) provide some clues as to how the facially-wounded were treated, and an increasing body of archaeological evidence can assist in determining what wounds were inflicted and how survivable they were. There was a fine line dividing prestigious battle scars (whose potential to convey honor can be contested) and facial injuries so disfiguring (or disabling) that they engendered horror and rejection, rather than admiration, in the viewer. There is some evidence that medical assistance was available, but whether it could mitigate the long-term effects of head and face injuries is open to question.
Item Description: Open Access funded by Wellcome Trust grant number 097469
Keywords: warfare, violence, medieval, faces, facial injury, masculinity
College: College of Arts and Humanities
Start Page: 81
End Page: 101