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Mental Capacity of Adult Patients in Health Care / Jeanette, Hewitt

Handbook of the Philosophy of Medicine, Pages: 1 - 21

Swansea University Author: Jeanette, Hewitt

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DOI (Published version): 10.1007/978-94-017-8706-2_28-1

Abstract

Mental capacity is a fundamental determinant of an individual’s ability to make autonomous decisions. Respect for autonomy is a legal and ethical requirement in healthcare provision, which necessitates that a person’s autonomous wishes be respected and informed consent validly obtained before therap...

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Published in: Handbook of the Philosophy of Medicine
ISBN: 978-94-017-8706-2 978-94-017-8706-2
Published: Netherlands Springer 2015
Online Access: http://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-94-017-8706-2_28-1
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa30151
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first_indexed 2016-09-22T04:00:09Z
last_indexed 2018-02-09T05:15:54Z
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spelling 2017-08-30T15:38:57.5495866 v2 30151 2016-09-21 Mental Capacity of Adult Patients in Health Care f6c07f307c1e1fbcd2701af80380163f Jeanette Hewitt Jeanette Hewitt true false 2016-09-21 HIS Mental capacity is a fundamental determinant of an individual’s ability to make autonomous decisions. Respect for autonomy is a legal and ethical requirement in healthcare provision, which necessitates that a person’s autonomous wishes be respected and informed consent validly obtained before therapeutic intervention is carried out. In Britain and many other Western jurisdictions, mental capacity legislation has developed with the aim of providing a framework for the assessment of mental capacity in health care, in a decision-specific context. Where a patient is judged to lack mental capacity with regard to a decision, the duty to respect autonomy is superseded by the duty to act beneficently and / or prevent harm which might otherwise occur due to the patient’s lack of capacity. Mental capacity legislation typically provides procedural criteria for assessing task-specific competence in terms of comprehension, appraisal and communication. Procedural criteria do not however specify a threshold for competency assessment, or provide guidance on evaluation of irrational belief systems. Procedural assessment of mental capacity may therefore provide only a partial indication of a person’s autonomy, and further evidence in terms of instrumental rationality may be necessary to evaluation of capacity. Book chapter Handbook of the Philosophy of Medicine 1 21 Springer Netherlands 978-94-017-8706-2 978-94-017-8706-2 Assessment, Autonomy, Best Interests, Choice, Decision-making, Informed Consent, Insight, Mental Capacity, Paternalism, Rationality, Serious Mental Illness, Voluntariness 1 10 2015 2015-10-01 10.1007/978-94-017-8706-2_28-1 http://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007/978-94-017-8706-2_28-1 COLLEGE NANME Interprofessional Studies COLLEGE CODE HIS Swansea University 2017-08-30T15:38:57.5495866 2016-09-21T22:29:43.9696350 College of Human and Health Sciences Interprofessional Studies Jeanette Hewitt 1
title Mental Capacity of Adult Patients in Health Care
spellingShingle Mental Capacity of Adult Patients in Health Care
Jeanette, Hewitt
title_short Mental Capacity of Adult Patients in Health Care
title_full Mental Capacity of Adult Patients in Health Care
title_fullStr Mental Capacity of Adult Patients in Health Care
title_full_unstemmed Mental Capacity of Adult Patients in Health Care
title_sort Mental Capacity of Adult Patients in Health Care
author_id_str_mv f6c07f307c1e1fbcd2701af80380163f
author_id_fullname_str_mv f6c07f307c1e1fbcd2701af80380163f_***_Jeanette, Hewitt
author Jeanette, Hewitt
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publisher Springer
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
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description Mental capacity is a fundamental determinant of an individual’s ability to make autonomous decisions. Respect for autonomy is a legal and ethical requirement in healthcare provision, which necessitates that a person’s autonomous wishes be respected and informed consent validly obtained before therapeutic intervention is carried out. In Britain and many other Western jurisdictions, mental capacity legislation has developed with the aim of providing a framework for the assessment of mental capacity in health care, in a decision-specific context. Where a patient is judged to lack mental capacity with regard to a decision, the duty to respect autonomy is superseded by the duty to act beneficently and / or prevent harm which might otherwise occur due to the patient’s lack of capacity. Mental capacity legislation typically provides procedural criteria for assessing task-specific competence in terms of comprehension, appraisal and communication. Procedural criteria do not however specify a threshold for competency assessment, or provide guidance on evaluation of irrational belief systems. Procedural assessment of mental capacity may therefore provide only a partial indication of a person’s autonomy, and further evidence in terms of instrumental rationality may be necessary to evaluation of capacity.
published_date 2015-10-01T03:40:50Z
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