No Cover Image

Journal article 438 views 165 downloads

Are Portrait Artists Superior Face Recognizers? Limited Impact of Adult Experience on Face Recognition Ability. / Jeremy, Tree; Ruth, Horry

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

Swansesa University Authors: Jeremy, Tree, Ruth, Horry

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.1037/xhp0000328

Abstract

Across two studies, we asked whether extensive experience in portrait art is associated with face recognition ability. In Study 1, 64 students completed a standardized face recognition test before and after completing a year-long art course that included substantial portraiture training. We found no...

Full description

Published in: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
ISSN: 0096-1523 1939-1277
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa30219
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2016-09-26T18:57:57Z
last_indexed 2018-07-31T13:18:36Z
id cronfa30219
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2018-07-31T10:01:27.9270624</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>30219</id><entry>2016-09-26</entry><title>Are Portrait Artists Superior Face Recognizers? Limited Impact of Adult Experience on Face Recognition Ability.</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>373fd575114a743d502a979c6161b1ad</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-6000-8125</ORCID><firstname>Jeremy</firstname><surname>Tree</surname><name>Jeremy Tree</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>ea243bc0327bc0213c076bda1fe85f10</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-3105-3781</ORCID><firstname>Ruth</firstname><surname>Horry</surname><name>Ruth Horry</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2016-09-26</date><deptcode>HPS</deptcode><abstract>Across two studies, we asked whether extensive experience in portrait art is associated with face recognition ability. In Study 1, 64 students completed a standardized face recognition test before and after completing a year-long art course that included substantial portraiture training. We found no evidence of an improvement in face recognition after training over and above what would be expected by practice alone. In Study 2, we investigated the possibility that more extensive experience might be needed for such advantages to emerge, by testing a cohort of expert portrait artists (N = 28), all of whom had many years of experience. In addition to memory for faces, we also explored memory for abstract art and for words in a paired-associate recognition test. The expert portrait artists performed similarly to a large, normative comparison sample on memory for faces and words, but showed a small advantage for abstract art. Taken together, our results converge with existing literature to suggest that there is relatively little plasticity in face recognition in adulthood, at which point our substantial everyday experience with faces may have pushed us to the limits of our capabilities.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance</journal><publisher/><issnPrint>0096-1523</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1939-1277</issnElectronic><keywords>Art expertise; face recognition; individual differences; plasticity</keywords><publishedDay>1</publishedDay><publishedMonth>1</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2017</publishedYear><publishedDate>2017-01-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1037/xhp0000328</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Psychology</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>HPS</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><lastEdited>2018-07-31T10:01:27.9270624</lastEdited><Created>2016-09-26T12:52:53.4959753</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Psychology</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Jeremy</firstname><surname>Tree</surname><orcid>0000-0001-6000-8125</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Ruth</firstname><surname>Horry</surname><orcid>0000-0003-3105-3781</orcid><order>2</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0030219-26092016130712.pdf</filename><originalFilename>TreeHorryRileyWilmer2016prepub.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2016-09-26T13:07:12.5200000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>588145</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><embargoDate>2016-09-26T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect></document></documents></rfc1807>
spelling 2018-07-31T10:01:27.9270624 v2 30219 2016-09-26 Are Portrait Artists Superior Face Recognizers? Limited Impact of Adult Experience on Face Recognition Ability. 373fd575114a743d502a979c6161b1ad 0000-0001-6000-8125 Jeremy Tree Jeremy Tree true false ea243bc0327bc0213c076bda1fe85f10 0000-0003-3105-3781 Ruth Horry Ruth Horry true false 2016-09-26 HPS Across two studies, we asked whether extensive experience in portrait art is associated with face recognition ability. In Study 1, 64 students completed a standardized face recognition test before and after completing a year-long art course that included substantial portraiture training. We found no evidence of an improvement in face recognition after training over and above what would be expected by practice alone. In Study 2, we investigated the possibility that more extensive experience might be needed for such advantages to emerge, by testing a cohort of expert portrait artists (N = 28), all of whom had many years of experience. In addition to memory for faces, we also explored memory for abstract art and for words in a paired-associate recognition test. The expert portrait artists performed similarly to a large, normative comparison sample on memory for faces and words, but showed a small advantage for abstract art. Taken together, our results converge with existing literature to suggest that there is relatively little plasticity in face recognition in adulthood, at which point our substantial everyday experience with faces may have pushed us to the limits of our capabilities. Journal Article Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 0096-1523 1939-1277 Art expertise; face recognition; individual differences; plasticity 1 1 2017 2017-01-01 10.1037/xhp0000328 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University 2018-07-31T10:01:27.9270624 2016-09-26T12:52:53.4959753 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Jeremy Tree 0000-0001-6000-8125 1 Ruth Horry 0000-0003-3105-3781 2 0030219-26092016130712.pdf TreeHorryRileyWilmer2016prepub.pdf 2016-09-26T13:07:12.5200000 Output 588145 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2016-09-26T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Are Portrait Artists Superior Face Recognizers? Limited Impact of Adult Experience on Face Recognition Ability.
spellingShingle Are Portrait Artists Superior Face Recognizers? Limited Impact of Adult Experience on Face Recognition Ability.
Jeremy, Tree
Ruth, Horry
title_short Are Portrait Artists Superior Face Recognizers? Limited Impact of Adult Experience on Face Recognition Ability.
title_full Are Portrait Artists Superior Face Recognizers? Limited Impact of Adult Experience on Face Recognition Ability.
title_fullStr Are Portrait Artists Superior Face Recognizers? Limited Impact of Adult Experience on Face Recognition Ability.
title_full_unstemmed Are Portrait Artists Superior Face Recognizers? Limited Impact of Adult Experience on Face Recognition Ability.
title_sort Are Portrait Artists Superior Face Recognizers? Limited Impact of Adult Experience on Face Recognition Ability.
author_id_str_mv 373fd575114a743d502a979c6161b1ad
ea243bc0327bc0213c076bda1fe85f10
author_id_fullname_str_mv 373fd575114a743d502a979c6161b1ad_***_Jeremy, Tree
ea243bc0327bc0213c076bda1fe85f10_***_Ruth, Horry
author Jeremy, Tree
Ruth, Horry
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 0096-1523
1939-1277
doi_str_mv 10.1037/xhp0000328
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Across two studies, we asked whether extensive experience in portrait art is associated with face recognition ability. In Study 1, 64 students completed a standardized face recognition test before and after completing a year-long art course that included substantial portraiture training. We found no evidence of an improvement in face recognition after training over and above what would be expected by practice alone. In Study 2, we investigated the possibility that more extensive experience might be needed for such advantages to emerge, by testing a cohort of expert portrait artists (N = 28), all of whom had many years of experience. In addition to memory for faces, we also explored memory for abstract art and for words in a paired-associate recognition test. The expert portrait artists performed similarly to a large, normative comparison sample on memory for faces and words, but showed a small advantage for abstract art. Taken together, our results converge with existing literature to suggest that there is relatively little plasticity in face recognition in adulthood, at which point our substantial everyday experience with faces may have pushed us to the limits of our capabilities.
published_date 2017-01-01T03:46:09Z
_version_ 1650237971466551296
score 10.867368