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Spatial Regulation in New York City: From Urban Renewal to Zero Tolerance / Themis, Chronopoulos

Swansea University Author: Themis, Chronopoulos

Abstract

This book demonstrates how spatial regulation became one of the most important ways to reverse the decline of New York City in the post–World War II period. As New York began to lose its status as a leading global city, the perception of urban disorder, whether that disorder was physical (e.g., slum...

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ISBN: 9780415891585
Published: Routledge 2011
Online Access: http://themis.slass.org/spatial-regulation-in-new-york-city.html
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa30511
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spelling 2017-03-09T16:25:17.4111940 v2 30511 2016-10-08 Spatial Regulation in New York City: From Urban Renewal to Zero Tolerance 72a13448038d4f74247005cdacb95f1d 0000-0003-2690-8634 Themis Chronopoulos Themis Chronopoulos true false 2016-10-08 APC This book demonstrates how spatial regulation became one of the most important ways to reverse the decline of New York City in the post–World War II period. As New York began to lose its status as a leading global city, the perception of urban disorder, whether that disorder was physical (e.g., slums, shabby streets, crumbling infrastructure) or social (e.g., homeless people, hustlers, rowdy teenagers), represented a threat to the middle class and investors and thus to the financial and political viability of the city government. Consequently, mayors and other elected and nonelected leaders mounted initiatives such as urban renewal, exclusionary zoning, antivagrancy laws, and order-maintenance policing to control, if not erase, disorder. These initiatives were part of a class project that deflected attention from the underlying causes of poverty, eroded civil rights, and sought to enable real estate investment, high-end consumption, mainstream tourism, and corporate success. The various strategies of spatial ordering that were employed corresponded to shifts in political ideology. Liberals who dominated New York City politics between the 1940s and the early 1970s emphasized physical solutions against disorder such as urban renewal and the elimination of slums. However, as urban renewal became discredited and crime increased dramatically, neoconservatives denounced postwar liberalism as the source of the city’s decline. After the fiscal crisis of 1975, brands of neoliberalism and neoconservatism merged and articulated a new vision of spatial regulation based on aggressive policing. Instead of redeveloping low-income African American and Latino neighborhoods, the authorities targeted people who committed minor infractions in public space. By the 1990s, these efforts to regulate urban space were promoted under the banners of “broken windows” and “zero-tolerance policing.” Book Routledge 9780415891585 1 1 2011 2011-01-01 http://themis.slass.org/spatial-regulation-in-new-york-city.html COLLEGE NANME Political and Cultural Studies COLLEGE CODE APC Swansea University 2017-03-09T16:25:17.4111940 2016-10-08T14:16:33.8960426 College of Arts and Humanities Political and Cultural Studies Themis Chronopoulos 0000-0003-2690-8634 1
title Spatial Regulation in New York City: From Urban Renewal to Zero Tolerance
spellingShingle Spatial Regulation in New York City: From Urban Renewal to Zero Tolerance
Themis, Chronopoulos
title_short Spatial Regulation in New York City: From Urban Renewal to Zero Tolerance
title_full Spatial Regulation in New York City: From Urban Renewal to Zero Tolerance
title_fullStr Spatial Regulation in New York City: From Urban Renewal to Zero Tolerance
title_full_unstemmed Spatial Regulation in New York City: From Urban Renewal to Zero Tolerance
title_sort Spatial Regulation in New York City: From Urban Renewal to Zero Tolerance
author_id_str_mv 72a13448038d4f74247005cdacb95f1d
author_id_fullname_str_mv 72a13448038d4f74247005cdacb95f1d_***_Themis, Chronopoulos
author Themis, Chronopoulos
format Book
publishDate 2011
institution Swansea University
isbn 9780415891585
publisher Routledge
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
department_str Political and Cultural Studies{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}Political and Cultural Studies
url http://themis.slass.org/spatial-regulation-in-new-york-city.html
document_store_str 0
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description This book demonstrates how spatial regulation became one of the most important ways to reverse the decline of New York City in the post–World War II period. As New York began to lose its status as a leading global city, the perception of urban disorder, whether that disorder was physical (e.g., slums, shabby streets, crumbling infrastructure) or social (e.g., homeless people, hustlers, rowdy teenagers), represented a threat to the middle class and investors and thus to the financial and political viability of the city government. Consequently, mayors and other elected and nonelected leaders mounted initiatives such as urban renewal, exclusionary zoning, antivagrancy laws, and order-maintenance policing to control, if not erase, disorder. These initiatives were part of a class project that deflected attention from the underlying causes of poverty, eroded civil rights, and sought to enable real estate investment, high-end consumption, mainstream tourism, and corporate success. The various strategies of spatial ordering that were employed corresponded to shifts in political ideology. Liberals who dominated New York City politics between the 1940s and the early 1970s emphasized physical solutions against disorder such as urban renewal and the elimination of slums. However, as urban renewal became discredited and crime increased dramatically, neoconservatives denounced postwar liberalism as the source of the city’s decline. After the fiscal crisis of 1975, brands of neoliberalism and neoconservatism merged and articulated a new vision of spatial regulation based on aggressive policing. Instead of redeveloping low-income African American and Latino neighborhoods, the authorities targeted people who committed minor infractions in public space. By the 1990s, these efforts to regulate urban space were promoted under the banners of “broken windows” and “zero-tolerance policing.”
published_date 2011-01-01T04:08:13Z
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score 10.882162