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Formulation of Generalized Mass Transfer Correlations for Blood Oxygenator Design

Kenny W. Q. Low, Raoul van Loon Orcid Logo, Johann Sienz Orcid Logo

Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, Volume: 139, Issue: 3, Start page: 031007

Swansea University Authors: Raoul van Loon Orcid Logo, Johann Sienz Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1115/1.4035535

Abstract

This paper numerically investigates non-Newtonian blood flow with oxygen and carbon dioxide transport across and along an array of uniformly square and staggered arranged fibres at various porosity (e) levels, focussing on a low Reynolds number regime (Re < 10). The objective is to establish suit...

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Published in: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering
ISSN: 0148-0731
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa31508
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spelling 2020-07-16T15:04:46.8401015 v2 31508 2016-12-16 Formulation of Generalized Mass Transfer Correlations for Blood Oxygenator Design 880b30f90841a022f1e5bac32fb12193 0000-0003-3581-5827 Raoul van Loon Raoul van Loon true false 17bf1dd287bff2cb01b53d98ceb28a31 0000-0003-3136-5718 Johann Sienz Johann Sienz true false 2016-12-16 MEDE This paper numerically investigates non-Newtonian blood flow with oxygen and carbon dioxide transport across and along an array of uniformly square and staggered arranged fibres at various porosity (e) levels, focussing on a low Reynolds number regime (Re < 10). The objective is to establish suitable mass transfer correlations, expressed in the form of Sherwood number (Sh = f (e,Re,Sc)), that identifies the link from local mass transfer investigations to full-device analyses. The development of a concentration field is initially investigated and expressions are established covering the range from a typical deoxygenated condition up to a full oxygenated condition. An important step is identified where a cut-off point in those expressions is required to avoid any under- or over-estimation on the Sherwood number. Geometrical features of a typical commercial blood oxygenator is adopted and results in general show that a balance in pressure drop, shear stress and mass transfer is required to avoid potential blood trauma or clotting formation. Different definitions of mass transfer correlations are found for oxygen/carbon dioxide, parallel/transverse flow and square/staggered configurations, respectively. From this set of correlations, it is found that transverse flow has better gas transfer than parallel flow which is consistent with reported literature. The mass transfer dependency on fibre configuration is observed to be pronounced at low porosity. This approach provides an initial platform when one is looking to improve the mass transfer performance in a blood oxygenator without the need to conduct any numerical simulations or experiments. Journal Article Journal of Biomechanical Engineering 139 3 031007 0148-0731 1 3 2017 2017-03-01 10.1115/1.4035535 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Engineering COLLEGE CODE MEDE Swansea University 2020-07-16T15:04:46.8401015 2016-12-16T12:22:21.4496352 College of Engineering Engineering Kenny W. Q. Low 1 Raoul van Loon 0000-0003-3581-5827 2 Johann Sienz 0000-0003-3136-5718 3 31508__4416__35bcb229a57b4952877d051b3684398f.pdf low2016.pdf 2016-12-16T12:23:44.9270000 Output 5578050 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2017-12-22T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Formulation of Generalized Mass Transfer Correlations for Blood Oxygenator Design
spellingShingle Formulation of Generalized Mass Transfer Correlations for Blood Oxygenator Design
Raoul van Loon
Johann Sienz
title_short Formulation of Generalized Mass Transfer Correlations for Blood Oxygenator Design
title_full Formulation of Generalized Mass Transfer Correlations for Blood Oxygenator Design
title_fullStr Formulation of Generalized Mass Transfer Correlations for Blood Oxygenator Design
title_full_unstemmed Formulation of Generalized Mass Transfer Correlations for Blood Oxygenator Design
title_sort Formulation of Generalized Mass Transfer Correlations for Blood Oxygenator Design
author_id_str_mv 880b30f90841a022f1e5bac32fb12193
17bf1dd287bff2cb01b53d98ceb28a31
author_id_fullname_str_mv 880b30f90841a022f1e5bac32fb12193_***_Raoul van Loon
17bf1dd287bff2cb01b53d98ceb28a31_***_Johann Sienz
author Raoul van Loon
Johann Sienz
author2 Kenny W. Q. Low
Raoul van Loon
Johann Sienz
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Biomechanical Engineering
container_volume 139
container_issue 3
container_start_page 031007
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 0148-0731
doi_str_mv 10.1115/1.4035535
college_str College of Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description This paper numerically investigates non-Newtonian blood flow with oxygen and carbon dioxide transport across and along an array of uniformly square and staggered arranged fibres at various porosity (e) levels, focussing on a low Reynolds number regime (Re < 10). The objective is to establish suitable mass transfer correlations, expressed in the form of Sherwood number (Sh = f (e,Re,Sc)), that identifies the link from local mass transfer investigations to full-device analyses. The development of a concentration field is initially investigated and expressions are established covering the range from a typical deoxygenated condition up to a full oxygenated condition. An important step is identified where a cut-off point in those expressions is required to avoid any under- or over-estimation on the Sherwood number. Geometrical features of a typical commercial blood oxygenator is adopted and results in general show that a balance in pressure drop, shear stress and mass transfer is required to avoid potential blood trauma or clotting formation. Different definitions of mass transfer correlations are found for oxygen/carbon dioxide, parallel/transverse flow and square/staggered configurations, respectively. From this set of correlations, it is found that transverse flow has better gas transfer than parallel flow which is consistent with reported literature. The mass transfer dependency on fibre configuration is observed to be pronounced at low porosity. This approach provides an initial platform when one is looking to improve the mass transfer performance in a blood oxygenator without the need to conduct any numerical simulations or experiments.
published_date 2017-03-01T03:43:22Z
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