No Cover Image

Journal article 138 views 21 downloads

Fast life history traits promote invasion success in amphibians and reptiles / William L. Allen; Sally E. Street; Isabella Capellini

Ecology Letters, Volume: 20, Issue: 2, Pages: 222 - 230

Swansea University Author: Allen, William

  • Allen_et_al-2017-Ecology_Letters.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.

    Download (862.16KB)

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.1111/ele.12728

Abstract

Competing theoretical models make different predictions on which life history strategies facilitate growth of small populations. While ‘fast’ strategies allow for rapid increase in population size and limit vulnerability to stochastic events, ‘slow’ strategies and bet-hedging may reduce variance in...

Full description

Published in: Ecology Letters
ISSN: 1461023X
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa31577
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Competing theoretical models make different predictions on which life history strategies facilitate growth of small populations. While ‘fast’ strategies allow for rapid increase in population size and limit vulnerability to stochastic events, ‘slow’ strategies and bet-hedging may reduce variance in vital rates in response to stochasticity. We test these predictions using biological invasions since founder alien populations start small, compiling the largest dataset yet of global herpetological introductions and life history traits. Using state-of-the-art phylogenetic comparative methods, we show that successful invaders have fast traits, such as large and frequent clutches, at both establishment and spread stages. These results, together with recent findings in mammals and plants, support ‘fast advantage’ models and the importance of high potential population growth rate. Conversely, successful alien birds are bet-hedgers. We propose that transient population dynamics and differences in longevity and behavioural flexibility can help reconcile apparently contrasting results across terrestrial vertebrate classes.
Keywords: amphibians, biological invasions, comparative analyses, invasion biology, invasive species, life history theory, population dynamics, population growth, reptiles, transient dynamics
College: College of Science
Issue: 2
Start Page: 222
End Page: 230