No Cover Image

Journal article 607 views 21 downloads

Fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene influences skeletal muscle phenotypes in non-resistance trained males and elite rugby playing position / Shane Heffernan, G. K. Stebbings, Liam Kilduff, R. M. Erskine, S. H. Day, C. I. Morse, J. S. McPhee, C. J. Cook, B. Vance, W. J. Ribbans, S. M. Raleigh, C. Roberts, M. A. Bennett, G. Wang, M. Collins, Y. P. Pitsiladis, A. G. Williams

BMC Genetics, Volume: 18, Issue: 1

Swansea University Authors: Shane Heffernan, Liam Kilduff

  • heffernan2017.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

    Download (490.75KB)

Abstract

BackgroundFTO gene variants have been associated with obesity phenotypes in sedentary and obese populations, but rarely with skeletal muscle and elite athlete phenotypes.MethodsIn 1089 participants, comprising 530 elite rugby athletes and 559 non-athletes, DNA was collected and genotyped for the FTO...

Full description

Published in: BMC Genetics
ISSN: 1471-2156 1471-2156
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa31717
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: BackgroundFTO gene variants have been associated with obesity phenotypes in sedentary and obese populations, but rarely with skeletal muscle and elite athlete phenotypes.MethodsIn 1089 participants, comprising 530 elite rugby athletes and 559 non-athletes, DNA was collected and genotyped for the FTO rs9939609 variant using real-time PCR. In a subgroup of non-resistance trained individuals (NT; n = 120), we also assessed structural and functional skeletal muscle phenotypes using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, ultrasound and isokinetic dynamometry. In a subgroup of rugby athletes (n = 77), we assessed muscle power during a countermovement jump.ResultsIn NT, TT genotype and T allele carriers had greater total body (4.8% and 4.1%) and total appendicular lean mass (LM; 3.0% and 2.1%) compared to AA genotype, with greater arm LM (0.8%) in T allele carriers and leg LM (2.1%) for TT, compared to AA genotype. Furthermore, the T allele was more common (94%) in selected elite rugby union athletes (back three and centre players) who are most reliant on LM rather than total body mass for success, compared to other rugby athletes (82%; P = 0.01, OR = 3.34) and controls (84%; P = 0.03, OR = 2.88). Accordingly, these athletes had greater peak power relative to body mass than other rugby athletes (14%; P = 2 x 10-6).ConclusionCollectively, these results suggest that the T allele is associated with increased LM and elite athletic success. This has implications for athletic populations, as well as conditions characterised by low LM such as sarcopenia and cachexia.
Keywords: RugbyGene project, IRX3, Lean mass
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 1