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Are Essay Mills committing fraud? An analysis of their behaviours vs the 2006 Fraud Act (UK)

Michael Draper Orcid Logo, Victoria Ibezim, Philip M. Newton, Phil Newton Orcid Logo

International Journal for Educational Integrity, Volume: 13, Issue: 1

Swansea University Authors: Michael Draper Orcid Logo, Phil Newton Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Many strategies have been proposed to address the use of Essay Mills and other ‘contract cheating’ services by students. These services generally offer bespoke custom-written essays or other assignments to students in exchange for a fee. There have been calls for the use of legal approaches to tackl...

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Published in: International Journal for Educational Integrity
ISSN: 1833-2595
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa31737
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first_indexed 2017-01-25T14:56:57Z
last_indexed 2018-02-09T05:18:54Z
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spelling 2017-02-15T14:12:11.5973718 v2 31737 2017-01-25 Are Essay Mills committing fraud? An analysis of their behaviours vs the 2006 Fraud Act (UK) 02beb9fc34a40c52d88c6e8ad9db1e92 0000-0003-1272-8122 Michael Draper Michael Draper true false 6e0a363d04c407371184d82f7a5bddc8 0000-0002-5272-7979 Phil Newton Phil Newton true false 2017-01-25 LAWD Many strategies have been proposed to address the use of Essay Mills and other ‘contract cheating’ services by students. These services generally offer bespoke custom-written essays or other assignments to students in exchange for a fee. There have been calls for the use of legal approaches to tackle the problem. Here we determine whether the UK Fraud Act (2006) might be used to tackle some of the activities of companies providing these services in the UK, by comparing their common practises, and their Terms and Conditions, with the Act. We found that all the sites examined have disclaimers regarding the use of their products but there are some obvious contradictions in the activities of the sites which undermine these disclaimers, for example all sites offer plagiarism-free guarantees for the work and at least eight have advertising which appears to contradict their terms and conditions. We identify possible areas in which the Act could be used to pursue a legal case but overall conclude that such an approach is unlikely to be effective. We call for a new offence to be created in UK law which specifically targets the undesirable behaviours of these companies in the UK, although the principles could be applied elsewhere. We also highlight other UK legal approaches that may be more successful. Journal Article International Journal for Educational Integrity 13 1 1833-2595 contract cheating plagiarism fraud essay mill Fraud Act QAA 25 1 2017 2017-01-25 10.1007/s40979-017-0014-5 COLLEGE NANME Law COLLEGE CODE LAWD Swansea University 2017-02-15T14:12:11.5973718 2017-01-25T06:22:56.6016018 Swansea University Medical School Medicine Michael Draper 0000-0003-1272-8122 1 Victoria Ibezim 2 Philip M. Newton 3 Phil Newton 0000-0002-5272-7979 4 0031737-15022017140405.pdf contract.pdf 2017-02-15T14:04:05.5400000 Output 432754 application/pdf Version of Record true 2017-01-25T00:00:00.0000000 This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY). true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Are Essay Mills committing fraud? An analysis of their behaviours vs the 2006 Fraud Act (UK)
spellingShingle Are Essay Mills committing fraud? An analysis of their behaviours vs the 2006 Fraud Act (UK)
Michael Draper
Phil Newton
title_short Are Essay Mills committing fraud? An analysis of their behaviours vs the 2006 Fraud Act (UK)
title_full Are Essay Mills committing fraud? An analysis of their behaviours vs the 2006 Fraud Act (UK)
title_fullStr Are Essay Mills committing fraud? An analysis of their behaviours vs the 2006 Fraud Act (UK)
title_full_unstemmed Are Essay Mills committing fraud? An analysis of their behaviours vs the 2006 Fraud Act (UK)
title_sort Are Essay Mills committing fraud? An analysis of their behaviours vs the 2006 Fraud Act (UK)
author_id_str_mv 02beb9fc34a40c52d88c6e8ad9db1e92
6e0a363d04c407371184d82f7a5bddc8
author_id_fullname_str_mv 02beb9fc34a40c52d88c6e8ad9db1e92_***_Michael Draper
6e0a363d04c407371184d82f7a5bddc8_***_Phil Newton
author Michael Draper
Phil Newton
author2 Michael Draper
Victoria Ibezim
Philip M. Newton
Phil Newton
format Journal article
container_title International Journal for Educational Integrity
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publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 1833-2595
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s40979-017-0014-5
college_str Swansea University Medical School
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hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
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hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
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description Many strategies have been proposed to address the use of Essay Mills and other ‘contract cheating’ services by students. These services generally offer bespoke custom-written essays or other assignments to students in exchange for a fee. There have been calls for the use of legal approaches to tackle the problem. Here we determine whether the UK Fraud Act (2006) might be used to tackle some of the activities of companies providing these services in the UK, by comparing their common practises, and their Terms and Conditions, with the Act. We found that all the sites examined have disclaimers regarding the use of their products but there are some obvious contradictions in the activities of the sites which undermine these disclaimers, for example all sites offer plagiarism-free guarantees for the work and at least eight have advertising which appears to contradict their terms and conditions. We identify possible areas in which the Act could be used to pursue a legal case but overall conclude that such an approach is unlikely to be effective. We call for a new offence to be created in UK law which specifically targets the undesirable behaviours of these companies in the UK, although the principles could be applied elsewhere. We also highlight other UK legal approaches that may be more successful.
published_date 2017-01-25T03:54:43Z
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