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In situ formation of organic–inorganic hybrid nanostructures for photovoltaic applications / Sebastian Wood, Oliver Garnett, Nurlan Tokmoldin, Wing C. Tsoi, Saif A. Haque, Ji-Seon Kim, Wing Chung Tsoi

Faraday Discussions

Swansea University Author: Wing Chung Tsoi

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DOI (Published version): 10.1039/C4FD00141A

Abstract

The performance of hybrid (organic–inorganic) photovoltaic devices is critically dependent on the thin film morphology. This work studies the film formation process using the in situ thermal decomposition of a soluble precursor to form a well-distributed network of CdS nanoparticles within a poly(3-...

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Published in: Faraday Discussions
ISSN: 1359-6640 1364-5498
Published: 2014
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa32052
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Abstract: The performance of hybrid (organic–inorganic) photovoltaic devices is critically dependent on the thin film morphology. This work studies the film formation process using the in situ thermal decomposition of a soluble precursor to form a well-distributed network of CdS nanoparticles within a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) polymer matrix. Resonant Raman spectroscopy is used to probe the formation of the inorganic nanoparticles and the corresponding changes in the molecular order of the polymer. We find that the CdS precursor decomposes rapidly upon heating to 160 °C, but that this has a disruptive effect on the P3HT. The extent of this disruption can be controlled by adjusting the annealing temperature, and nanowire aggregates of P3HT are found to have increased susceptibility. Atomic force microscopy reveals that at high temperatures (>200 °C), cracks form in the film, resulting in a ‘plateau’-like microstructure. In order to retain the preferable ‘granular’ microstructure and to control the molecular disruption, low decomposition temperatures are needed. This work identifies a particular problem for optimising the hybrid thin film morphology and shows how it can be partially overcome.
College: College of Engineering