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Exploring the importance of discretionary mobility in later life / Charles Musselwhite

Working with Older People, Volume: 21, Issue: 1, Pages: 49 - 58

Swansea University Author: Charles, Musselwhite

DOI (Published version): 10.1108/WWOP-12-2016-0038

Abstract

Purpose Travel and mobility for older people has typically focussed on the practical benefits to the individual, for example, in meeting utilitarian needs of shopping, appointments and staying connected to family and friends. However, research has hinted that travel for its own sake, to get out and...

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Published in: Working with Older People
Published: 2017
Online Access: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/WWOP-12-2016-0038
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa32126
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However, research has hinted that travel for its own sake, to get out and about and feel and experience mobility, may be just as important for older people and is especially missed when individuals give-up driving. Design/methodology/approach This paper examines travel for its own sake, usually referred to as discretionary travel, interviewing 20 older people in each of three different contexts: for drivers, for community transport users and for non-drivers who receive lifts from family and friends Findings Older people not only enjoy discretionary travel, but also feel it is beneficial to their health and wellbeing. The car and especially driving, is seen as the best way to fulfil discretionary travel. Community transport users do fulfil discretionary travel needs but these are over formalised and lack spontaneity affecting feelings of control and identity Receiving lifts from family and friends can often result in older people feeling a burden to the providers of the lifts especially when travel is viewed as discretionary. Research limitations/implications . Practical implications More needs to be done to ensure discretionary travel needs are met for those without cars, highlighting the importance of such travel to community transport providers and helping reduce the feeling of being a burden to family and friends Originality/value Policy, practice and research has tended to focus on transport as a means to an end. However, older people themselves value mobility just as much for its own sake and just to view nature. Such discretionary reasons for mobility are actually very important for health and wellbeing of older people and need more attention.AB - Purpose Travel and mobility for older people has typically focussed on the practical benefits to the individual, for example, in meeting utilitarian needs of shopping, appointments and staying connected to family and friends. However, research has hinted that travel for its own sake, to get out and about and feel and experience mobility, may be just as important for older people and is especially missed when individuals give-up driving. Design/methodology/approach This paper examines travel for its own sake, usually referred to as discretionary travel, interviewing 20 older people in each of three different contexts: for drivers, for community transport users and for non-drivers who receive lifts from family and friends Findings Older people not only enjoy discretionary travel, but also feel it is beneficial to their health and wellbeing. The car and especially driving, is seen as the best way to fulfil discretionary travel. Community transport users do fulfil discretionary travel needs but these are over formalised and lack spontaneity affecting feelings of control and identity Receiving lifts from family and friends can often result in older people feeling a burden to the providers of the lifts especially when travel is viewed as discretionary. Research limitations/implications . Practical implications More needs to be done to ensure discretionary travel needs are met for those without cars, highlighting the importance of such travel to community transport providers and helping reduce the feeling of being a burden to family and friends Originality/value Policy, practice and research has tended to focus on transport as a means to an end. However, older people themselves value mobility just as much for its own sake and just to view nature. Such discretionary reasons for mobility are actually very important for health and wellbeing of older people and need more attention.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Working with Older People</journal><volume>21</volume><journalNumber>1</journalNumber><paginationStart>49</paginationStart><paginationEnd>58</paginationEnd><publisher/><keywords>Mobility, transport, older drivers, community transport, wellbeing; health</keywords><publishedDay>28</publishedDay><publishedMonth>2</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2017</publishedYear><publishedDate>2017-02-28</publishedDate><doi>10.1108/WWOP-12-2016-0038</doi><url>http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/WWOP-12-2016-0038</url><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Centre for Innovative Ageing</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>HIA</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><lastEdited>2017-08-01T12:00:59.0048568</lastEdited><Created>2017-02-27T11:24:34.3967696</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Centre for Innovative Ageing</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Charles</firstname><surname>Musselwhite</surname><orcid>0000-0002-4831-2092</orcid><order>1</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0032126-27022017112714.pdf</filename><originalFilename>MusselwhiteDiscretionaryTravel.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2017-02-27T11:27:14.1770000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>247039</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><embargoDate>2018-03-13T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2017-08-01T12:00:59.0048568 v2 32126 2017-02-27 Exploring the importance of discretionary mobility in later life c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c 0000-0002-4831-2092 Charles Musselwhite Charles Musselwhite true false 2017-02-27 HIA Purpose Travel and mobility for older people has typically focussed on the practical benefits to the individual, for example, in meeting utilitarian needs of shopping, appointments and staying connected to family and friends. However, research has hinted that travel for its own sake, to get out and about and feel and experience mobility, may be just as important for older people and is especially missed when individuals give-up driving. Design/methodology/approach This paper examines travel for its own sake, usually referred to as discretionary travel, interviewing 20 older people in each of three different contexts: for drivers, for community transport users and for non-drivers who receive lifts from family and friends Findings Older people not only enjoy discretionary travel, but also feel it is beneficial to their health and wellbeing. The car and especially driving, is seen as the best way to fulfil discretionary travel. Community transport users do fulfil discretionary travel needs but these are over formalised and lack spontaneity affecting feelings of control and identity Receiving lifts from family and friends can often result in older people feeling a burden to the providers of the lifts especially when travel is viewed as discretionary. Research limitations/implications . Practical implications More needs to be done to ensure discretionary travel needs are met for those without cars, highlighting the importance of such travel to community transport providers and helping reduce the feeling of being a burden to family and friends Originality/value Policy, practice and research has tended to focus on transport as a means to an end. However, older people themselves value mobility just as much for its own sake and just to view nature. Such discretionary reasons for mobility are actually very important for health and wellbeing of older people and need more attention.AB - Purpose Travel and mobility for older people has typically focussed on the practical benefits to the individual, for example, in meeting utilitarian needs of shopping, appointments and staying connected to family and friends. However, research has hinted that travel for its own sake, to get out and about and feel and experience mobility, may be just as important for older people and is especially missed when individuals give-up driving. Design/methodology/approach This paper examines travel for its own sake, usually referred to as discretionary travel, interviewing 20 older people in each of three different contexts: for drivers, for community transport users and for non-drivers who receive lifts from family and friends Findings Older people not only enjoy discretionary travel, but also feel it is beneficial to their health and wellbeing. The car and especially driving, is seen as the best way to fulfil discretionary travel. Community transport users do fulfil discretionary travel needs but these are over formalised and lack spontaneity affecting feelings of control and identity Receiving lifts from family and friends can often result in older people feeling a burden to the providers of the lifts especially when travel is viewed as discretionary. Research limitations/implications . Practical implications More needs to be done to ensure discretionary travel needs are met for those without cars, highlighting the importance of such travel to community transport providers and helping reduce the feeling of being a burden to family and friends Originality/value Policy, practice and research has tended to focus on transport as a means to an end. However, older people themselves value mobility just as much for its own sake and just to view nature. Such discretionary reasons for mobility are actually very important for health and wellbeing of older people and need more attention. Journal Article Working with Older People 21 1 49 58 Mobility, transport, older drivers, community transport, wellbeing; health 28 2 2017 2017-02-28 10.1108/WWOP-12-2016-0038 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/WWOP-12-2016-0038 COLLEGE NANME Centre for Innovative Ageing COLLEGE CODE HIA Swansea University 2017-08-01T12:00:59.0048568 2017-02-27T11:24:34.3967696 College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing Charles Musselwhite 0000-0002-4831-2092 1 0032126-27022017112714.pdf MusselwhiteDiscretionaryTravel.pdf 2017-02-27T11:27:14.1770000 Output 247039 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-03-13T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Exploring the importance of discretionary mobility in later life
spellingShingle Exploring the importance of discretionary mobility in later life
Charles, Musselwhite
title_short Exploring the importance of discretionary mobility in later life
title_full Exploring the importance of discretionary mobility in later life
title_fullStr Exploring the importance of discretionary mobility in later life
title_full_unstemmed Exploring the importance of discretionary mobility in later life
title_sort Exploring the importance of discretionary mobility in later life
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author_id_fullname_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c_***_Charles, Musselwhite
author Charles, Musselwhite
author2 Charles Musselwhite
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description Purpose Travel and mobility for older people has typically focussed on the practical benefits to the individual, for example, in meeting utilitarian needs of shopping, appointments and staying connected to family and friends. However, research has hinted that travel for its own sake, to get out and about and feel and experience mobility, may be just as important for older people and is especially missed when individuals give-up driving. Design/methodology/approach This paper examines travel for its own sake, usually referred to as discretionary travel, interviewing 20 older people in each of three different contexts: for drivers, for community transport users and for non-drivers who receive lifts from family and friends Findings Older people not only enjoy discretionary travel, but also feel it is beneficial to their health and wellbeing. The car and especially driving, is seen as the best way to fulfil discretionary travel. Community transport users do fulfil discretionary travel needs but these are over formalised and lack spontaneity affecting feelings of control and identity Receiving lifts from family and friends can often result in older people feeling a burden to the providers of the lifts especially when travel is viewed as discretionary. Research limitations/implications . Practical implications More needs to be done to ensure discretionary travel needs are met for those without cars, highlighting the importance of such travel to community transport providers and helping reduce the feeling of being a burden to family and friends Originality/value Policy, practice and research has tended to focus on transport as a means to an end. However, older people themselves value mobility just as much for its own sake and just to view nature. Such discretionary reasons for mobility are actually very important for health and wellbeing of older people and need more attention.AB - Purpose Travel and mobility for older people has typically focussed on the practical benefits to the individual, for example, in meeting utilitarian needs of shopping, appointments and staying connected to family and friends. However, research has hinted that travel for its own sake, to get out and about and feel and experience mobility, may be just as important for older people and is especially missed when individuals give-up driving. Design/methodology/approach This paper examines travel for its own sake, usually referred to as discretionary travel, interviewing 20 older people in each of three different contexts: for drivers, for community transport users and for non-drivers who receive lifts from family and friends Findings Older people not only enjoy discretionary travel, but also feel it is beneficial to their health and wellbeing. The car and especially driving, is seen as the best way to fulfil discretionary travel. Community transport users do fulfil discretionary travel needs but these are over formalised and lack spontaneity affecting feelings of control and identity Receiving lifts from family and friends can often result in older people feeling a burden to the providers of the lifts especially when travel is viewed as discretionary. Research limitations/implications . Practical implications More needs to be done to ensure discretionary travel needs are met for those without cars, highlighting the importance of such travel to community transport providers and helping reduce the feeling of being a burden to family and friends Originality/value Policy, practice and research has tended to focus on transport as a means to an end. However, older people themselves value mobility just as much for its own sake and just to view nature. Such discretionary reasons for mobility are actually very important for health and wellbeing of older people and need more attention.
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