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Use of lumpfish for sea-lice control in salmon farming: challenges and opportunities / Adam Powell, Jim W. Treasurer, Craig L. Pooley, Alex J. Keay, Richard Lloyd, Albert K. Imsland, Carlos Garcia De Leaniz

Reviews in Aquaculture

Swansea University Author: Carlos Garcia De Leaniz

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/raq.12194

Abstract

Efficient sea-lice control remains one of the most important challenges for the salmon farming industry. The use of wrasse (Labridae) as cleaner fish offers an alternative to medicines for sea-lice control, but wrasse tend to become inactive in winter. Lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus) continue to feed...

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Published in: Reviews in Aquaculture
ISSN: 17535123
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa32923
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first_indexed 2017-04-04T12:49:00Z
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spelling 2017-05-08T09:55:37.0815866 v2 32923 2017-04-04 Use of lumpfish for sea-lice control in salmon farming: challenges and opportunities 1c70acd0fd64edb0856b7cf34393ab02 0000-0003-1650-2729 Carlos Garcia De Leaniz Carlos Garcia De Leaniz true false 2017-04-04 SBI Efficient sea-lice control remains one of the most important challenges for the salmon farming industry. The use of wrasse (Labridae) as cleaner fish offers an alternative to medicines for sea-lice control, but wrasse tend to become inactive in winter. Lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus) continue to feed on sea-lice at low temperatures, and commercial production has escalated from thousands of fish in 2010 to well over 30 million juveniles deployed in 2016. However, production still relies on the capture of wild broodstock, which may not be sustainable. To meet global industry needs, lumpfish production needs to increase to reach c. 50 million fish annually and this can only come from aquaculture. We review current production methods and the use of lumpfish in sea cages and identify some of the main challenges and bottlenecks facing lumpfish intensification. Our gap analysis indicates that the areas in most need of research include better control of maturation for year-round production; formulation of appropriate diets; artificial selection of elite lines with desirable traits; and development of vaccines for certified, disease-free juvenile production. The welfare of farmed lumpfish also needs to be better quantified, and more information is needed on optimal densities and tank design. Finally, the risk of farmed lumpfish escaping from net pens needs to be critically assessed, and we argue that it might be beneficial to recover cleaner fish from salmon cages after the production cycle, perhaps using them as broodstock, for export to the Asian food markets or for the production of animal feeds. Journal Article Reviews in Aquaculture 17535123 31 3 2017 2017-03-31 10.1111/raq.12194 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2017-05-08T09:55:37.0815866 2017-04-04T06:00:01.0424830 College of Science Biosciences Adam Powell 1 Jim W. Treasurer 2 Craig L. Pooley 3 Alex J. Keay 4 Richard Lloyd 5 Albert K. Imsland 6 Carlos Garcia De Leaniz 0000-0003-1650-2729 7 0032923-08052017095448.pdf Powell.pdf 2017-05-08T09:54:48.7070000 Output 966730 application/pdf Version of Record true 2017-03-09T00:00:00.0000000 This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use,distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. true eng
title Use of lumpfish for sea-lice control in salmon farming: challenges and opportunities
spellingShingle Use of lumpfish for sea-lice control in salmon farming: challenges and opportunities
Carlos, Garcia De Leaniz
title_short Use of lumpfish for sea-lice control in salmon farming: challenges and opportunities
title_full Use of lumpfish for sea-lice control in salmon farming: challenges and opportunities
title_fullStr Use of lumpfish for sea-lice control in salmon farming: challenges and opportunities
title_full_unstemmed Use of lumpfish for sea-lice control in salmon farming: challenges and opportunities
title_sort Use of lumpfish for sea-lice control in salmon farming: challenges and opportunities
author_id_str_mv 1c70acd0fd64edb0856b7cf34393ab02
author_id_fullname_str_mv 1c70acd0fd64edb0856b7cf34393ab02_***_Carlos, Garcia De Leaniz
author Carlos, Garcia De Leaniz
author2 Adam Powell
Jim W. Treasurer
Craig L. Pooley
Alex J. Keay
Richard Lloyd
Albert K. Imsland
Carlos Garcia De Leaniz
format Journal article
container_title Reviews in Aquaculture
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 17535123
doi_str_mv 10.1111/raq.12194
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Efficient sea-lice control remains one of the most important challenges for the salmon farming industry. The use of wrasse (Labridae) as cleaner fish offers an alternative to medicines for sea-lice control, but wrasse tend to become inactive in winter. Lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus) continue to feed on sea-lice at low temperatures, and commercial production has escalated from thousands of fish in 2010 to well over 30 million juveniles deployed in 2016. However, production still relies on the capture of wild broodstock, which may not be sustainable. To meet global industry needs, lumpfish production needs to increase to reach c. 50 million fish annually and this can only come from aquaculture. We review current production methods and the use of lumpfish in sea cages and identify some of the main challenges and bottlenecks facing lumpfish intensification. Our gap analysis indicates that the areas in most need of research include better control of maturation for year-round production; formulation of appropriate diets; artificial selection of elite lines with desirable traits; and development of vaccines for certified, disease-free juvenile production. The welfare of farmed lumpfish also needs to be better quantified, and more information is needed on optimal densities and tank design. Finally, the risk of farmed lumpfish escaping from net pens needs to be critically assessed, and we argue that it might be beneficial to recover cleaner fish from salmon cages after the production cycle, perhaps using them as broodstock, for export to the Asian food markets or for the production of animal feeds.
published_date 2017-03-31T03:48:27Z
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