No Cover Image

Journal article 621 views 76 downloads

Boldness traits, not dominance, predict exploratory flight range and homing behaviour in homing pigeons

Steven J. Portugal, Rhianna L. Ricketts, Jackie Chappell, Craig R. White, Emily Shepard Orcid Logo, Dora Biro

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Volume: 372, Issue: 1727, Start page: 20160234

Swansea University Author: Emily Shepard Orcid Logo

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.1098/rstb.2016.0234

Abstract

This study investigated whether consistent individual differences in behaviour (particularly exploratory tendency and object neophilia) were associated with the tendency to explore in free-ranging scenarios. This was tested in homing pigeons. The results showed that birds that were more likely to ex...

Full description

Published in: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
ISSN: 0962-8436 1471-2970
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa32981
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2017-08-03T14:38:05Z
last_indexed 2018-04-11T09:12:11Z
id cronfa32981
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2018-04-10T10:06:45.5521857</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>32981</id><entry>2017-04-11</entry><title>Boldness traits, not dominance, predict exploratory flight range and homing behaviour in homing pigeons</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>54729295145aa1ea56d176818d51ed6a</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-7325-6398</ORCID><firstname>Emily</firstname><surname>Shepard</surname><name>Emily Shepard</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2017-04-11</date><deptcode>SBI</deptcode><abstract>This study investigated whether consistent individual differences in behaviour (particularly exploratory tendency and object neophilia) were associated with the tendency to explore in free-ranging scenarios. This was tested in homing pigeons. The results showed that birds that were more likely to explore in the loft were also more likely to explore the local area during self-driven flights. When birds were released from a fixed release points, those which had explored less took more tortuous and longer routes back to the loft. This demonstrates the cost associated with lack of exploratory behaviour, and also links traits measured in laboratory scenarios to behaviour in free-ranging animals.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences</journal><volume>372</volume><journalNumber>1727</journalNumber><paginationStart>20160234</paginationStart><publisher/><issnPrint>0962-8436</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1471-2970</issnElectronic><keywords>Columba livia, dominance hierarchy, GPS, personality, navigation, neophobia</keywords><publishedDay>19</publishedDay><publishedMonth>8</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2017</publishedYear><publishedDate>2017-08-19</publishedDate><doi>10.1098/rstb.2016.0234</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Biosciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>SBI</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2018-04-10T10:06:45.5521857</lastEdited><Created>2017-04-11T11:39:22.0117529</Created><path><level id="1">College of Science</level><level id="2">Biosciences</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Steven J.</firstname><surname>Portugal</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Rhianna L.</firstname><surname>Ricketts</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Jackie</firstname><surname>Chappell</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Craig R.</firstname><surname>White</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Emily</firstname><surname>Shepard</surname><orcid>0000-0001-7325-6398</orcid><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Dora</firstname><surname>Biro</surname><order>6</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0032981-11042017114316.pdf</filename><originalFilename>Portugal_PhilTransB_2017.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2017-04-11T11:43:16.3100000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>383285</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><embargoDate>2017-06-03T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2018-04-10T10:06:45.5521857 v2 32981 2017-04-11 Boldness traits, not dominance, predict exploratory flight range and homing behaviour in homing pigeons 54729295145aa1ea56d176818d51ed6a 0000-0001-7325-6398 Emily Shepard Emily Shepard true false 2017-04-11 SBI This study investigated whether consistent individual differences in behaviour (particularly exploratory tendency and object neophilia) were associated with the tendency to explore in free-ranging scenarios. This was tested in homing pigeons. The results showed that birds that were more likely to explore in the loft were also more likely to explore the local area during self-driven flights. When birds were released from a fixed release points, those which had explored less took more tortuous and longer routes back to the loft. This demonstrates the cost associated with lack of exploratory behaviour, and also links traits measured in laboratory scenarios to behaviour in free-ranging animals. Journal Article Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 372 1727 20160234 0962-8436 1471-2970 Columba livia, dominance hierarchy, GPS, personality, navigation, neophobia 19 8 2017 2017-08-19 10.1098/rstb.2016.0234 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2018-04-10T10:06:45.5521857 2017-04-11T11:39:22.0117529 College of Science Biosciences Steven J. Portugal 1 Rhianna L. Ricketts 2 Jackie Chappell 3 Craig R. White 4 Emily Shepard 0000-0001-7325-6398 5 Dora Biro 6 0032981-11042017114316.pdf Portugal_PhilTransB_2017.pdf 2017-04-11T11:43:16.3100000 Output 383285 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2017-06-03T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Boldness traits, not dominance, predict exploratory flight range and homing behaviour in homing pigeons
spellingShingle Boldness traits, not dominance, predict exploratory flight range and homing behaviour in homing pigeons
Emily Shepard
title_short Boldness traits, not dominance, predict exploratory flight range and homing behaviour in homing pigeons
title_full Boldness traits, not dominance, predict exploratory flight range and homing behaviour in homing pigeons
title_fullStr Boldness traits, not dominance, predict exploratory flight range and homing behaviour in homing pigeons
title_full_unstemmed Boldness traits, not dominance, predict exploratory flight range and homing behaviour in homing pigeons
title_sort Boldness traits, not dominance, predict exploratory flight range and homing behaviour in homing pigeons
author_id_str_mv 54729295145aa1ea56d176818d51ed6a
author_id_fullname_str_mv 54729295145aa1ea56d176818d51ed6a_***_Emily Shepard
author Emily Shepard
author2 Steven J. Portugal
Rhianna L. Ricketts
Jackie Chappell
Craig R. White
Emily Shepard
Dora Biro
format Journal article
container_title Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
container_volume 372
container_issue 1727
container_start_page 20160234
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 0962-8436
1471-2970
doi_str_mv 10.1098/rstb.2016.0234
college_str College of Science
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description This study investigated whether consistent individual differences in behaviour (particularly exploratory tendency and object neophilia) were associated with the tendency to explore in free-ranging scenarios. This was tested in homing pigeons. The results showed that birds that were more likely to explore in the loft were also more likely to explore the local area during self-driven flights. When birds were released from a fixed release points, those which had explored less took more tortuous and longer routes back to the loft. This demonstrates the cost associated with lack of exploratory behaviour, and also links traits measured in laboratory scenarios to behaviour in free-ranging animals.
published_date 2017-08-19T03:45:11Z
_version_ 1737026030170800128
score 10.896665