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The energy landscape predicts flight height and wind turbine collision hazard in three species of large soaring raptor / Emily, Shepard

Journal of Applied Ecology

Swansea University Author: Emily, Shepard

Abstract

Flight height was examined in a range of soaring raptors in order to predict the potential collision risk between these birds and wind turbines. This study developed a new method to account for the uncertainty in measurement of flight height from GPS-based measurements of altitude. The results indic...

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Published in: Journal of Applied Ecology
ISSN: 00218901
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa32982
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first_indexed 2017-04-11T13:03:29Z
last_indexed 2018-08-01T13:26:51Z
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spelling 2018-08-01T12:18:53.1133955 v2 32982 2017-04-11 The energy landscape predicts flight height and wind turbine collision hazard in three species of large soaring raptor 54729295145aa1ea56d176818d51ed6a 0000-0001-7325-6398 Emily Shepard Emily Shepard true false 2017-04-11 SBI Flight height was examined in a range of soaring raptors in order to predict the potential collision risk between these birds and wind turbines. This study developed a new method to account for the uncertainty in measurement of flight height from GPS-based measurements of altitude. The results indicate that species vary in their collision risk in line with expectations based on body size. In addition, collision risk can be predicted from thermal uplift potential. The new methods can be applied to other systems to examine collision risk. Journal Article Journal of Applied Ecology 00218901 flight height, movement ecology, 3D, human-wildlife conflict, wind turbines, wind power, continuous-time, raptor, state-space models, z-axis GPS tracking data 10 4 2017 2017-04-10 10.1111/1365-2664.12909 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2664.12909/full COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2018-08-01T12:18:53.1133955 2017-04-11T11:53:23.9996156 College of Science Biosciences Guillaume Péron 1 Christen H. Fleming 2 Olivier Duriez 3 Julie Fluhr 4 Christian Itty 5 Sergio Lambertucci 6 Kamran Safi 7 Emily Shepard 0000-0001-7325-6398 8 Justin M. Calabrese 9 Silke Bauer 10 0032982-11042017115353.pdf Péron_RaptorFlightHeight_JApplE_2017.pdf 2017-04-11T11:53:53.8270000 Output 581209 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-03-27T00:00:00.0000000 12 month embargo. true eng
title The energy landscape predicts flight height and wind turbine collision hazard in three species of large soaring raptor
spellingShingle The energy landscape predicts flight height and wind turbine collision hazard in three species of large soaring raptor
Emily, Shepard
title_short The energy landscape predicts flight height and wind turbine collision hazard in three species of large soaring raptor
title_full The energy landscape predicts flight height and wind turbine collision hazard in three species of large soaring raptor
title_fullStr The energy landscape predicts flight height and wind turbine collision hazard in three species of large soaring raptor
title_full_unstemmed The energy landscape predicts flight height and wind turbine collision hazard in three species of large soaring raptor
title_sort The energy landscape predicts flight height and wind turbine collision hazard in three species of large soaring raptor
author_id_str_mv 54729295145aa1ea56d176818d51ed6a
author_id_fullname_str_mv 54729295145aa1ea56d176818d51ed6a_***_Emily, Shepard
author Emily, Shepard
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Applied Ecology
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 00218901
doi_str_mv 10.1111/1365-2664.12909
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
url http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2664.12909/full
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Flight height was examined in a range of soaring raptors in order to predict the potential collision risk between these birds and wind turbines. This study developed a new method to account for the uncertainty in measurement of flight height from GPS-based measurements of altitude. The results indicate that species vary in their collision risk in line with expectations based on body size. In addition, collision risk can be predicted from thermal uplift potential. The new methods can be applied to other systems to examine collision risk.
published_date 2017-04-10T20:37:11Z
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score 10.891744