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High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy

Sean Davies, Spencer Jeffs Orcid Logo, Robert Lancaster Orcid Logo, Gavin Baxter

Materials, Volume: 10, Issue: 5, Start page: 457

Swansea University Authors: Spencer Jeffs Orcid Logo, Robert Lancaster Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/ma10050457

Abstract

The realisation of employing Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) technologies to produce components in the aerospace industry is significantly increasing. This can be attributed to their ability to offer the near-net shape fabrication of fully dense components with a high potential for geometrical op...

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Published in: Materials
ISSN: 1996-1944
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa33184
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spelling 2020-06-24T10:28:46.7178091 v2 33184 2017-05-04 High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy 6ff76d567df079d8bf299990849c3d8f 0000-0002-2819-9651 Spencer Jeffs Spencer Jeffs true false e1a1b126acd3e4ff734691ec34967f29 0000-0002-1365-6944 Robert Lancaster Robert Lancaster true false 2017-05-04 AERO The realisation of employing Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) technologies to produce components in the aerospace industry is significantly increasing. This can be attributed to their ability to offer the near-net shape fabrication of fully dense components with a high potential for geometrical optimisation, all of which contribute to subsequent reductions in material wastage and component weight. However, the influence of this manufacturing route on the properties of aerospace alloys must first be fully understood before being actively applied in-service. Specimens from the nickel superalloy C263 have been manufactured using Powder Bed Direct Laser Deposition (PB-DLD), each with unique post-processing conditions. These variables include two build orientations, vertical and horizontal, and two different heat treatments. The effects of build orientation and post-process heat treatments on the materials’ mechanical properties have been assessed with the Small Punch Tensile (SPT) test technique, a practical test method given the limited availability of PB-DLD consolidated material. SPT testing was also conducted on a cast C263 variant to compare with PB-DLD derivatives. At both room and elevated temperature conditions, differences in mechanical performances arose between each material variant. This was found to be instigated by microstructural variations exposed through microscopic and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. SPT results were also compared with available uniaxial tensile data in terms of SPT peak and yield load against uniaxial ultimate tensile and yield strength. Journal Article Materials 10 5 457 1996-1944 small punch; tensile; powder bed direct laser deposition; C263 26 4 2017 2017-04-26 10.3390/ma10050457 COLLEGE NANME Aerospace Engineering COLLEGE CODE AERO Swansea University 2020-06-24T10:28:46.7178091 2017-05-04T11:19:42.1220282 College of Engineering Engineering Sean Davies 1 Spencer Jeffs 0000-0002-2819-9651 2 Robert Lancaster 0000-0002-1365-6944 3 Gavin Baxter 4 0033184-04052017112206.pdf davies2017.pdf 2017-05-04T11:22:06.3000000 Output 7468160 application/pdf Version of Record true 2017-05-04T00:00:00.0000000 This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy
spellingShingle High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy
Spencer, Jeffs
Robert, Lancaster
title_short High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy
title_full High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy
title_fullStr High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy
title_full_unstemmed High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy
title_sort High Temperature Deformation Mechanisms in a DLD Nickel Superalloy
author_id_str_mv 6ff76d567df079d8bf299990849c3d8f
e1a1b126acd3e4ff734691ec34967f29
author_id_fullname_str_mv 6ff76d567df079d8bf299990849c3d8f_***_Spencer, Jeffs_***_0000-0002-2819-9651
e1a1b126acd3e4ff734691ec34967f29_***_Robert, Lancaster_***_0000-0002-1365-6944
author Spencer, Jeffs
Robert, Lancaster
author2 Sean Davies
Spencer Jeffs
Robert Lancaster
Gavin Baxter
format Journal article
container_title Materials
container_volume 10
container_issue 5
container_start_page 457
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 1996-1944
doi_str_mv 10.3390/ma10050457
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
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description The realisation of employing Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) technologies to produce components in the aerospace industry is significantly increasing. This can be attributed to their ability to offer the near-net shape fabrication of fully dense components with a high potential for geometrical optimisation, all of which contribute to subsequent reductions in material wastage and component weight. However, the influence of this manufacturing route on the properties of aerospace alloys must first be fully understood before being actively applied in-service. Specimens from the nickel superalloy C263 have been manufactured using Powder Bed Direct Laser Deposition (PB-DLD), each with unique post-processing conditions. These variables include two build orientations, vertical and horizontal, and two different heat treatments. The effects of build orientation and post-process heat treatments on the materials’ mechanical properties have been assessed with the Small Punch Tensile (SPT) test technique, a practical test method given the limited availability of PB-DLD consolidated material. SPT testing was also conducted on a cast C263 variant to compare with PB-DLD derivatives. At both room and elevated temperature conditions, differences in mechanical performances arose between each material variant. This was found to be instigated by microstructural variations exposed through microscopic and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. SPT results were also compared with available uniaxial tensile data in terms of SPT peak and yield load against uniaxial ultimate tensile and yield strength.
published_date 2017-04-26T03:55:06Z
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