No Cover Image

Journal article 909 views 136 downloads

Baby-Led Weaning: The Evidence to Date

Amy Brown Orcid Logo, Sarah Jones, Hannah Rowan

Current Nutrition Reports, Volume: 6, Issue: 2, Pages: 148 - 156

Swansea University Authors: Amy Brown Orcid Logo, Sarah Jones

  • ABrown.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

    Download (269.82KB)

Abstract

Purpose of ReviewInfants are traditionally introduced to solid foods using spoon-feeding of specially prepared infant foods.Recent FindingsHowever, over the last 10–15 years, an alternative approach termed ‘baby-led weaning’ has grown in popularity. This approach involves allowing infants to self-fe...

Full description

Published in: Current Nutrition Reports
ISSN: 2161-3311
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa33244
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2017-05-06T18:59:07Z
last_indexed 2022-01-01T03:50:53Z
id cronfa33244
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2021-12-31T10:53:49.1754898</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>33244</id><entry>2017-05-06</entry><title>Baby-Led Weaning: The Evidence to Date</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-0438-0157</ORCID><firstname>Amy</firstname><surname>Brown</surname><name>Amy Brown</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>283f3f6215a86a1c6c992736fed22c2b</sid><ORCID/><firstname>Sarah</firstname><surname>Jones</surname><name>Sarah Jones</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2017-05-06</date><deptcode>PHAC</deptcode><abstract>Purpose of ReviewInfants are traditionally introduced to solid foods using spoon-feeding of specially prepared infant foods.Recent FindingsHowever, over the last 10&#x2013;15 years, an alternative approach termed &#x2018;baby-led weaning&#x2019; has grown in popularity. This approach involves allowing infants to self-feed family foods, encouraging the infant to set the pace and intake of the meal. Proponents of the approach believe it promotes healthy eating behaviour and weight gain trajectories, and evidence is starting to build surrounding the method. This review brings together all empirical evidence to date examining behaviours associated with the approach, its outcomes and confounding factors.SummaryOverall, although there is limited evidence suggesting that a baby-led approach may encourage positive outcomes, limitations of the data leave these conclusions weak. Further research is needed, particularly to explore pathways to impact and understand the approach in different contexts and populations.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Current Nutrition Reports</journal><volume>6</volume><journalNumber>2</journalNumber><paginationStart>148</paginationStart><paginationEnd>156</paginationEnd><publisher>Springer Science and Business Media LLC</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint/><issnElectronic>2161-3311</issnElectronic><keywords>Baby-led weaning; Weaning; Introduction solid foods; Complementary feeding; Responsive feeding; Infant-led; Breastfeeding; Maternal; Infant; Weight; Eating behaviour; Appetite control; Maternal feeding style; Nutrient intake; Energy regulation; Choking</keywords><publishedDay>1</publishedDay><publishedMonth>6</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2017</publishedYear><publishedDate>2017-06-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1007/s13668-017-0201-2</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Public Health</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>PHAC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2021-12-31T10:53:49.1754898</lastEdited><Created>2017-05-06T13:59:33.6744949</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Public Health and Policy Studies</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Amy</firstname><surname>Brown</surname><orcid>0000-0002-0438-0157</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Sarah</firstname><surname>Jones</surname><orcid/><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Hannah</firstname><surname>Rowan</surname><order>3</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0033244-01062017115244.pdf</filename><originalFilename>ABrown.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2017-06-01T11:52:44.2170000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>342443</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><documentNotes>This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language><licence>http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/</licence></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2021-12-31T10:53:49.1754898 v2 33244 2017-05-06 Baby-Led Weaning: The Evidence to Date 37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3 0000-0002-0438-0157 Amy Brown Amy Brown true false 283f3f6215a86a1c6c992736fed22c2b Sarah Jones Sarah Jones true false 2017-05-06 PHAC Purpose of ReviewInfants are traditionally introduced to solid foods using spoon-feeding of specially prepared infant foods.Recent FindingsHowever, over the last 10–15 years, an alternative approach termed ‘baby-led weaning’ has grown in popularity. This approach involves allowing infants to self-feed family foods, encouraging the infant to set the pace and intake of the meal. Proponents of the approach believe it promotes healthy eating behaviour and weight gain trajectories, and evidence is starting to build surrounding the method. This review brings together all empirical evidence to date examining behaviours associated with the approach, its outcomes and confounding factors.SummaryOverall, although there is limited evidence suggesting that a baby-led approach may encourage positive outcomes, limitations of the data leave these conclusions weak. Further research is needed, particularly to explore pathways to impact and understand the approach in different contexts and populations. Journal Article Current Nutrition Reports 6 2 148 156 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2161-3311 Baby-led weaning; Weaning; Introduction solid foods; Complementary feeding; Responsive feeding; Infant-led; Breastfeeding; Maternal; Infant; Weight; Eating behaviour; Appetite control; Maternal feeding style; Nutrient intake; Energy regulation; Choking 1 6 2017 2017-06-01 10.1007/s13668-017-0201-2 COLLEGE NANME Public Health COLLEGE CODE PHAC Swansea University 2021-12-31T10:53:49.1754898 2017-05-06T13:59:33.6744949 College of Human and Health Sciences Public Health and Policy Studies Amy Brown 0000-0002-0438-0157 1 Sarah Jones 2 Hannah Rowan 3 0033244-01062017115244.pdf ABrown.pdf 2017-06-01T11:52:44.2170000 Output 342443 application/pdf Version of Record true This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Baby-Led Weaning: The Evidence to Date
spellingShingle Baby-Led Weaning: The Evidence to Date
Amy Brown
Sarah Jones
title_short Baby-Led Weaning: The Evidence to Date
title_full Baby-Led Weaning: The Evidence to Date
title_fullStr Baby-Led Weaning: The Evidence to Date
title_full_unstemmed Baby-Led Weaning: The Evidence to Date
title_sort Baby-Led Weaning: The Evidence to Date
author_id_str_mv 37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3
283f3f6215a86a1c6c992736fed22c2b
author_id_fullname_str_mv 37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3_***_Amy Brown
283f3f6215a86a1c6c992736fed22c2b_***_Sarah Jones
author Amy Brown
Sarah Jones
author2 Amy Brown
Sarah Jones
Hannah Rowan
format Journal article
container_title Current Nutrition Reports
container_volume 6
container_issue 2
container_start_page 148
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 2161-3311
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s13668-017-0201-2
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Public Health and Policy Studies{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Public Health and Policy Studies
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Purpose of ReviewInfants are traditionally introduced to solid foods using spoon-feeding of specially prepared infant foods.Recent FindingsHowever, over the last 10–15 years, an alternative approach termed ‘baby-led weaning’ has grown in popularity. This approach involves allowing infants to self-feed family foods, encouraging the infant to set the pace and intake of the meal. Proponents of the approach believe it promotes healthy eating behaviour and weight gain trajectories, and evidence is starting to build surrounding the method. This review brings together all empirical evidence to date examining behaviours associated with the approach, its outcomes and confounding factors.SummaryOverall, although there is limited evidence suggesting that a baby-led approach may encourage positive outcomes, limitations of the data leave these conclusions weak. Further research is needed, particularly to explore pathways to impact and understand the approach in different contexts and populations.
published_date 2017-06-01T03:45:29Z
_version_ 1737026048162267136
score 10.88812