No Cover Image

Journal article 497 views 93 downloads

Captive labour: asylum seekers, migrants and employment in UK immigration removal centres / Jon Burnett, F. Chebe

Race & Class, Volume: 51, Issue: 4, Pages: 95 - 103

Swansea University Author: Jon Burnett

Abstract

The steady growth in the use of immigration detention under the UK's New Labour government has been mirrored by the concurrent development of a new form of labour market within immigration removal centres (IRCs). This market has grown out of the long history of what some label as exploitative e...

Full description

Published in: Race & Class
ISSN: 0306-3968 1741-3125
Published: 2010
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa33870
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2017-05-31T20:11:59Z
last_indexed 2021-09-14T02:50:26Z
id cronfa33870
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2021-09-13T09:54:46.8957178</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>33870</id><entry>2017-05-22</entry><title>Captive labour: asylum seekers, migrants and employment in UK immigration removal centres</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>3c4e0496f3701567ac4a28536ff237f9</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-9229-897X</ORCID><firstname>Jon</firstname><surname>Burnett</surname><name>Jon Burnett</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2017-05-22</date><deptcode>CSSP</deptcode><abstract>The steady growth in the use of immigration detention under the UK's New Labour government has been mirrored by the concurrent development of a new form of labour market within immigration removal centres (IRCs). This market has grown out of the long history of what some label as exploitative employment practices used amongst the wider prison population. It relies upon a subtle form of coercion which ensures compliance and discipline and, in so doing, provides a cheap and easily exploitable pool of labour for private sector companies. The research for this article draws on findings from prison inspection reports and the annual reports of independent monitoring boards.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Race &amp; Class</journal><volume>51</volume><journalNumber>4</journalNumber><paginationStart>95</paginationStart><paginationEnd>103</paginationEnd><publisher/><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>0306-3968</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1741-3125</issnElectronic><keywords>immigration detention, prisoner rights, prison labour, undocumented working, penal labour, exploitation, immigration removal centres</keywords><publishedDay>13</publishedDay><publishedMonth>4</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2010</publishedYear><publishedDate>2010-04-13</publishedDate><doi>10.1177/0306396810363051</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Criminology, Sociology and Social Policy</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>CSSP</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2021-09-13T09:54:46.8957178</lastEdited><Created>2017-05-22T19:38:54.9703139</Created><path><level id="1">Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law</level><level id="2">Law</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Jon</firstname><surname>Burnett</surname><orcid>0000-0002-9229-897X</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>F.</firstname><surname>Chebe</surname><order>2</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0033870-31052017153006.pdf</filename><originalFilename>Captive_labourBurnettChebe.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2017-05-31T15:30:06.5200000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>223083</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><embargoDate>2017-05-31T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2021-09-13T09:54:46.8957178 v2 33870 2017-05-22 Captive labour: asylum seekers, migrants and employment in UK immigration removal centres 3c4e0496f3701567ac4a28536ff237f9 0000-0002-9229-897X Jon Burnett Jon Burnett true false 2017-05-22 CSSP The steady growth in the use of immigration detention under the UK's New Labour government has been mirrored by the concurrent development of a new form of labour market within immigration removal centres (IRCs). This market has grown out of the long history of what some label as exploitative employment practices used amongst the wider prison population. It relies upon a subtle form of coercion which ensures compliance and discipline and, in so doing, provides a cheap and easily exploitable pool of labour for private sector companies. The research for this article draws on findings from prison inspection reports and the annual reports of independent monitoring boards. Journal Article Race & Class 51 4 95 103 0306-3968 1741-3125 immigration detention, prisoner rights, prison labour, undocumented working, penal labour, exploitation, immigration removal centres 13 4 2010 2010-04-13 10.1177/0306396810363051 COLLEGE NANME Criminology, Sociology and Social Policy COLLEGE CODE CSSP Swansea University 2021-09-13T09:54:46.8957178 2017-05-22T19:38:54.9703139 Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law Law Jon Burnett 0000-0002-9229-897X 1 F. Chebe 2 0033870-31052017153006.pdf Captive_labourBurnettChebe.pdf 2017-05-31T15:30:06.5200000 Output 223083 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2017-05-31T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Captive labour: asylum seekers, migrants and employment in UK immigration removal centres
spellingShingle Captive labour: asylum seekers, migrants and employment in UK immigration removal centres
Jon, Burnett
title_short Captive labour: asylum seekers, migrants and employment in UK immigration removal centres
title_full Captive labour: asylum seekers, migrants and employment in UK immigration removal centres
title_fullStr Captive labour: asylum seekers, migrants and employment in UK immigration removal centres
title_full_unstemmed Captive labour: asylum seekers, migrants and employment in UK immigration removal centres
title_sort Captive labour: asylum seekers, migrants and employment in UK immigration removal centres
author_id_str_mv 3c4e0496f3701567ac4a28536ff237f9
author_id_fullname_str_mv 3c4e0496f3701567ac4a28536ff237f9_***_Jon, Burnett
author Jon, Burnett
author2 Jon Burnett
F. Chebe
format Journal article
container_title Race & Class
container_volume 51
container_issue 4
container_start_page 95
publishDate 2010
institution Swansea University
issn 0306-3968
1741-3125
doi_str_mv 10.1177/0306396810363051
college_str Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id hillaryrodhamclintonschooloflaw
hierarchy_top_title Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
hierarchy_parent_id hillaryrodhamclintonschooloflaw
hierarchy_parent_title Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
department_str Law{{{_:::_}}}Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law{{{_:::_}}}Law
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description The steady growth in the use of immigration detention under the UK's New Labour government has been mirrored by the concurrent development of a new form of labour market within immigration removal centres (IRCs). This market has grown out of the long history of what some label as exploitative employment practices used amongst the wider prison population. It relies upon a subtle form of coercion which ensures compliance and discipline and, in so doing, provides a cheap and easily exploitable pool of labour for private sector companies. The research for this article draws on findings from prison inspection reports and the annual reports of independent monitoring boards.
published_date 2010-04-13T03:53:03Z
_version_ 1714467879785594880
score 10.830003