No Cover Image

Book Chapter 404 views 73 downloads

Women, attorneys and credit in late medieval England / Matthew Stevens

Volume: 12

Swansea University Author: Stevens, Matthew

Abstract

This article is a path-breaking attempt to assess systematically women’s use of attorneys in English royal common law courts c.1400–c.1500, comprising a case study of women’s litigation before the king’s national Court of Common Pleas, at Westminster. It focuses on credit- and debt-litigation, the m...

Full description

ISBN: 978-2-503-57052-5 978-2-503-57053-2
ISSN: 2295-9254 2295-9262
Published: Turnhout: Brepols 2018
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa33931
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2017-05-24T20:00:07Z
last_indexed 2019-03-12T19:34:52Z
id cronfa33931
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2019-03-12T16:27:42Z</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>33931</id><entry>2017-05-24</entry><title>Women, attorneys and credit in late medieval England</title><alternativeTitle></alternativeTitle><author>Matthew Stevens</author><firstname>Matthew</firstname><surname>Stevens</surname><active>true</active><ORCID/><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent><sid>24e42c4652a3104d12bc7424d475408d</sid><email>f76fe15f6b6d702865d83efd18240498</email><emailaddr>y7f85WN3wGh/bI3AieJPfhXCE6Z9OGBXOD9D5JU4+T4=</emailaddr><date>2017-05-24</date><deptcode>AHIS</deptcode><abstract>This article is a path-breaking attempt to assess systematically women&#x2019;s use of attorneys in English royal common law courts c.1400&#x2013;c.1500, comprising a case study of women&#x2019;s litigation before the king&#x2019;s national Court of Common Pleas, at Westminster. It focuses on credit- and debt-litigation, the most common type of litigation before the court. First, it assesses the availability of lawyers to women. Second, it establishes which women (that is, by condition or marital status) employed attorneys in credit- and debt-related lawsuits as plaintiffs or defendants, and explores the extent to which records of women&#x2019;s use of attorneys can serve as a proxy measure of women&#x2019;s confidence in their ability to interact with the legal system. Third, it examines the attorneys who served women, asking if lawyers either specialized in representing women or discriminated against them, and whether they typically had geographical associations with the women they represented. It is concluded that women capitalized on the wide availability of lawyers, whose representation would have bolstered their confidence in using the courts and thereby helped to keep them engaged in lending and borrowing irrespective of the perceived declining social position of women at the close of the Middle Ages.</abstract><type>Chapter in book</type><journal></journal><volume>12</volume><journalNumber/><paginationStart/><paginationEnd/><publisher>Turnhout: Brepols</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint>978-2-503-57052-5</isbnPrint><isbnElectronic>978-2-503-57053-2</isbnElectronic><issnPrint>2295-9254</issnPrint><issnElectronic>2295-9262</issnElectronic><keywords>Credit, Debt, Lawyer, Attorney, Middle Ages, Medieval, Widow, Women, Common Law, England, litigation</keywords><publishedDay>0</publishedDay><publishedMonth>0</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2018</publishedYear><publishedDate>2018-01-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1484/M.EER-EB.5.111944</doi><url>https://www.brepolsonline.net/action/showBook?doi=10.1484/M.EER-EB.5.111944</url><notes>GOLD OPEN ACCESS</notes><college>College of Arts and Humanities</college><department>History</department><CollegeCode>CAAH</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>AHIS</DepartmentCode><institution/><researchGroup>Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research</researchGroup><supervisor/><sponsorsfunders>Swedish Riksbank</sponsorsfunders><grantnumber/><degreelevel/><degreename>None</degreename><lastEdited>2019-03-12T16:27:42Z</lastEdited><Created>2017-05-24T15:52:30Z</Created><path><level id="1">College of Arts and Humanities</level><level id="2">History</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Matthew</firstname><surname>Stevens</surname><orcid>0000-0001-8646-951X</orcid><order>1</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0033931-26072017095642.pdf</filename><originalFilename>StevensWomenattorneys.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2017-07-26T09:56:42Z</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>238785</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>AM</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action>Updated Copyright</action><actionDate>26/07/2017</actionDate><embargoDate>2017-07-26T00:00:00</embargoDate><documentNotes/><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents></rfc1807>
spelling 2019-03-12T16:27:42Z v2 33931 2017-05-24 Women, attorneys and credit in late medieval England Matthew Stevens Matthew Stevens true false 24e42c4652a3104d12bc7424d475408d f76fe15f6b6d702865d83efd18240498 y7f85WN3wGh/bI3AieJPfhXCE6Z9OGBXOD9D5JU4+T4= 2017-05-24 AHIS This article is a path-breaking attempt to assess systematically women’s use of attorneys in English royal common law courts c.1400–c.1500, comprising a case study of women’s litigation before the king’s national Court of Common Pleas, at Westminster. It focuses on credit- and debt-litigation, the most common type of litigation before the court. First, it assesses the availability of lawyers to women. Second, it establishes which women (that is, by condition or marital status) employed attorneys in credit- and debt-related lawsuits as plaintiffs or defendants, and explores the extent to which records of women’s use of attorneys can serve as a proxy measure of women’s confidence in their ability to interact with the legal system. Third, it examines the attorneys who served women, asking if lawyers either specialized in representing women or discriminated against them, and whether they typically had geographical associations with the women they represented. It is concluded that women capitalized on the wide availability of lawyers, whose representation would have bolstered their confidence in using the courts and thereby helped to keep them engaged in lending and borrowing irrespective of the perceived declining social position of women at the close of the Middle Ages. Chapter in book 12 Turnhout: Brepols 978-2-503-57052-5 978-2-503-57053-2 2295-9254 2295-9262 Credit, Debt, Lawyer, Attorney, Middle Ages, Medieval, Widow, Women, Common Law, England, litigation 0 0 2018 2018-01-01 10.1484/M.EER-EB.5.111944 https://www.brepolsonline.net/action/showBook?doi=10.1484/M.EER-EB.5.111944 GOLD OPEN ACCESS College of Arts and Humanities History CAAH AHIS Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research Swedish Riksbank None 2019-03-12T16:27:42Z 2017-05-24T15:52:30Z College of Arts and Humanities History Matthew Stevens 0000-0001-8646-951X 1 0033931-26072017095642.pdf StevensWomenattorneys.pdf 2017-07-26T09:56:42Z Output 238785 application/pdf AM true Updated Copyright 26/07/2017 2017-07-26T00:00:00 true eng
title Women, attorneys and credit in late medieval England
spellingShingle Women, attorneys and credit in late medieval England
Stevens, Matthew
title_short Women, attorneys and credit in late medieval England
title_full Women, attorneys and credit in late medieval England
title_fullStr Women, attorneys and credit in late medieval England
title_full_unstemmed Women, attorneys and credit in late medieval England
title_sort Women, attorneys and credit in late medieval England
author_id_str_mv 24e42c4652a3104d12bc7424d475408d
author_id_fullname_str_mv 24e42c4652a3104d12bc7424d475408d_***_Stevens, Matthew
author Stevens, Matthew
author2 Matthew Stevens
format Book Chapter
container_volume 12
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
isbn 978-2-503-57052-5
978-2-503-57053-2
issn 2295-9254
2295-9262
doi_str_mv 10.1484/M.EER-EB.5.111944
publisher Turnhout: Brepols
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
department_str History{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}History
url https://www.brepolsonline.net/action/showBook?doi=10.1484/M.EER-EB.5.111944
document_store_str 1
active_str 1
researchgroup_str Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research
description This article is a path-breaking attempt to assess systematically women’s use of attorneys in English royal common law courts c.1400–c.1500, comprising a case study of women’s litigation before the king’s national Court of Common Pleas, at Westminster. It focuses on credit- and debt-litigation, the most common type of litigation before the court. First, it assesses the availability of lawyers to women. Second, it establishes which women (that is, by condition or marital status) employed attorneys in credit- and debt-related lawsuits as plaintiffs or defendants, and explores the extent to which records of women’s use of attorneys can serve as a proxy measure of women’s confidence in their ability to interact with the legal system. Third, it examines the attorneys who served women, asking if lawyers either specialized in representing women or discriminated against them, and whether they typically had geographical associations with the women they represented. It is concluded that women capitalized on the wide availability of lawyers, whose representation would have bolstered their confidence in using the courts and thereby helped to keep them engaged in lending and borrowing irrespective of the perceived declining social position of women at the close of the Middle Ages.
published_date 2018-01-01T11:47:17Z
_version_ 1634047609625640960
score 11.317979