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A comparison of different heat maintenance methods implemented during a simulated half-time period in professional Rugby Union players / Mark Russell, Reuben Tucker, Christian J. Cook, Thibault Giroud, Liam Kilduff

Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Volume: 21, Issue: 3, Pages: 327 - 332

Swansea University Author: Liam Kilduff

Abstract

ObjectivesIn thermoneutral conditions, half-time is associated with reductions in body temperature that acutely impair performance. This laboratory-based study compared active, passive, and combined methods of half-time heat maintenance.DesignRandomised, counterbalanced, cross-overMethodsAfter a sta...

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Published in: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
ISSN: 1440-2440
Published: Elsevier BV 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa34115
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2020-08-21T17:15:13.5960521</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>34115</id><entry>2017-06-02</entry><title>A comparison of different heat maintenance methods implemented during a simulated half-time period in professional Rugby Union players</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-9449-2293</ORCID><firstname>Liam</firstname><surname>Kilduff</surname><name>Liam Kilduff</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2017-06-02</date><deptcode>STSC</deptcode><abstract>ObjectivesIn thermoneutral conditions, half-time is associated with reductions in body temperature that acutely impair performance. This laboratory-based study compared active, passive, and combined methods of half-time heat maintenance.DesignRandomised, counterbalanced, cross-overMethodsAfter a standardised warm-up (WU) and 15 min of rest, professional Rugby Union players (n = 20) completed a repeated sprint test (RSSA1). Throughout a simulated half-time (temperature: 20.5 &#xB1; 0.3 &#xB0;C; humidity: 53 &#xB1; 5%), players then rested (Control) or wore a survival jacket (Passive) for 15 min, or performed a 7 min rewarm-up after either 8 min of rest (Active), or 8 min of wearing a survival jacket (Combined). A second RSSA (RSSA2) followed. Core temperature (Tcore) and peak power output (PPO; during countermovement jumps; CMJ) were measured at baseline, post-RSSA1, pre-RSSA2.ResultsAll half-time interventions attenuated reductions in Tcore (0.62 &#xB1; 0.28 &#xB0;C) observed in Control (Passive: &#x2212;0.23 &#xB1; 0.09 &#xB0;C; Active: &#x2212;0.17 &#xB1; 0.09 &#xB0;C; Combined: &#x2212;0.03 &#xB1; 0.10 &#xB0;C, all p &amp;#60; 0.001) but Combined preserved Tcore the most (p &amp;#60; 0.001). All half-time interventions attenuated the 385 &#xB1; 137 W reduction in Control PPO (Passive: &#x2212;213 &#xB1; 79 W; Active: &#x2212;83 &#xB1; 72 W; Combined: +10 &#xB1; 52 W; all p &amp;#60; 0.001); with best PPO maintenance in Combined (p &#x2264; 0.001). The fastest sprints occurred in RSSA2 in Combined (6.74 &#xB1; 0.21 s; p&amp;#60;0.001) but Passive (6.82 &#xB1; 0.04 s) and Active (6.80 &#xB1; 0.05 s) sprints were 0.4% (p = 0.011) and 0.8% (p = 0.002) quicker than Control (6.85 &#xB1; 0.04 s), respectively.ConclusionsWhile the efficacy of passive and active heat maintenance methods was supported throughout a simulated half-time, a combined approach to attenuating heat losses appeared the most beneficial for Tcore and subsequent PPO and sprint performance in professional Rugby Union players.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport</journal><volume>21</volume><journalNumber>3</journalNumber><paginationStart>327</paginationStart><paginationEnd>332</paginationEnd><publisher>Elsevier BV</publisher><issnPrint>1440-2440</issnPrint><keywords>Temperature; intermittent; warm-up; rewarm-up; soccer</keywords><publishedDay>1</publishedDay><publishedMonth>3</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2018</publishedYear><publishedDate>2018-03-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1016/j.jsams.2017.06.005</doi><url>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2017.06.005</url><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2020-08-21T17:15:13.5960521</lastEdited><Created>2017-06-02T09:09:05.9417792</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Engineering</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Mark</firstname><surname>Russell</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Reuben</firstname><surname>Tucker</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Christian J.</firstname><surname>Cook</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Thibault</firstname><surname>Giroud</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Liam</firstname><surname>Kilduff</surname><orcid>0000-0001-9449-2293</orcid><order>5</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0034115-09062017091825.pdf</filename><originalFilename>russell2017(2).pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2017-06-09T09:18:25.9870000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>430550</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><embargoDate>2018-06-08T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2020-08-21T17:15:13.5960521 v2 34115 2017-06-02 A comparison of different heat maintenance methods implemented during a simulated half-time period in professional Rugby Union players 972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98 0000-0001-9449-2293 Liam Kilduff Liam Kilduff true false 2017-06-02 STSC ObjectivesIn thermoneutral conditions, half-time is associated with reductions in body temperature that acutely impair performance. This laboratory-based study compared active, passive, and combined methods of half-time heat maintenance.DesignRandomised, counterbalanced, cross-overMethodsAfter a standardised warm-up (WU) and 15 min of rest, professional Rugby Union players (n = 20) completed a repeated sprint test (RSSA1). Throughout a simulated half-time (temperature: 20.5 ± 0.3 °C; humidity: 53 ± 5%), players then rested (Control) or wore a survival jacket (Passive) for 15 min, or performed a 7 min rewarm-up after either 8 min of rest (Active), or 8 min of wearing a survival jacket (Combined). A second RSSA (RSSA2) followed. Core temperature (Tcore) and peak power output (PPO; during countermovement jumps; CMJ) were measured at baseline, post-RSSA1, pre-RSSA2.ResultsAll half-time interventions attenuated reductions in Tcore (0.62 ± 0.28 °C) observed in Control (Passive: −0.23 ± 0.09 °C; Active: −0.17 ± 0.09 °C; Combined: −0.03 ± 0.10 °C, all p &#60; 0.001) but Combined preserved Tcore the most (p &#60; 0.001). All half-time interventions attenuated the 385 ± 137 W reduction in Control PPO (Passive: −213 ± 79 W; Active: −83 ± 72 W; Combined: +10 ± 52 W; all p &#60; 0.001); with best PPO maintenance in Combined (p ≤ 0.001). The fastest sprints occurred in RSSA2 in Combined (6.74 ± 0.21 s; p&#60;0.001) but Passive (6.82 ± 0.04 s) and Active (6.80 ± 0.05 s) sprints were 0.4% (p = 0.011) and 0.8% (p = 0.002) quicker than Control (6.85 ± 0.04 s), respectively.ConclusionsWhile the efficacy of passive and active heat maintenance methods was supported throughout a simulated half-time, a combined approach to attenuating heat losses appeared the most beneficial for Tcore and subsequent PPO and sprint performance in professional Rugby Union players. Journal Article Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 21 3 327 332 Elsevier BV 1440-2440 Temperature; intermittent; warm-up; rewarm-up; soccer 1 3 2018 2018-03-01 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.06.005 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2017.06.005 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2020-08-21T17:15:13.5960521 2017-06-02T09:09:05.9417792 College of Engineering Engineering Mark Russell 1 Reuben Tucker 2 Christian J. Cook 3 Thibault Giroud 4 Liam Kilduff 0000-0001-9449-2293 5 0034115-09062017091825.pdf russell2017(2).pdf 2017-06-09T09:18:25.9870000 Output 430550 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-06-08T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title A comparison of different heat maintenance methods implemented during a simulated half-time period in professional Rugby Union players
spellingShingle A comparison of different heat maintenance methods implemented during a simulated half-time period in professional Rugby Union players
Liam, Kilduff
title_short A comparison of different heat maintenance methods implemented during a simulated half-time period in professional Rugby Union players
title_full A comparison of different heat maintenance methods implemented during a simulated half-time period in professional Rugby Union players
title_fullStr A comparison of different heat maintenance methods implemented during a simulated half-time period in professional Rugby Union players
title_full_unstemmed A comparison of different heat maintenance methods implemented during a simulated half-time period in professional Rugby Union players
title_sort A comparison of different heat maintenance methods implemented during a simulated half-time period in professional Rugby Union players
author_id_str_mv 972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98
author_id_fullname_str_mv 972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98_***_Liam, Kilduff
author Liam, Kilduff
author2 Mark Russell
Reuben Tucker
Christian J. Cook
Thibault Giroud
Liam Kilduff
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
container_volume 21
container_issue 3
container_start_page 327
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 1440-2440
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.jsams.2017.06.005
publisher Elsevier BV
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2017.06.005
document_store_str 1
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description ObjectivesIn thermoneutral conditions, half-time is associated with reductions in body temperature that acutely impair performance. This laboratory-based study compared active, passive, and combined methods of half-time heat maintenance.DesignRandomised, counterbalanced, cross-overMethodsAfter a standardised warm-up (WU) and 15 min of rest, professional Rugby Union players (n = 20) completed a repeated sprint test (RSSA1). Throughout a simulated half-time (temperature: 20.5 ± 0.3 °C; humidity: 53 ± 5%), players then rested (Control) or wore a survival jacket (Passive) for 15 min, or performed a 7 min rewarm-up after either 8 min of rest (Active), or 8 min of wearing a survival jacket (Combined). A second RSSA (RSSA2) followed. Core temperature (Tcore) and peak power output (PPO; during countermovement jumps; CMJ) were measured at baseline, post-RSSA1, pre-RSSA2.ResultsAll half-time interventions attenuated reductions in Tcore (0.62 ± 0.28 °C) observed in Control (Passive: −0.23 ± 0.09 °C; Active: −0.17 ± 0.09 °C; Combined: −0.03 ± 0.10 °C, all p &#60; 0.001) but Combined preserved Tcore the most (p &#60; 0.001). All half-time interventions attenuated the 385 ± 137 W reduction in Control PPO (Passive: −213 ± 79 W; Active: −83 ± 72 W; Combined: +10 ± 52 W; all p &#60; 0.001); with best PPO maintenance in Combined (p ≤ 0.001). The fastest sprints occurred in RSSA2 in Combined (6.74 ± 0.21 s; p&#60;0.001) but Passive (6.82 ± 0.04 s) and Active (6.80 ± 0.05 s) sprints were 0.4% (p = 0.011) and 0.8% (p = 0.002) quicker than Control (6.85 ± 0.04 s), respectively.ConclusionsWhile the efficacy of passive and active heat maintenance methods was supported throughout a simulated half-time, a combined approach to attenuating heat losses appeared the most beneficial for Tcore and subsequent PPO and sprint performance in professional Rugby Union players.
published_date 2018-03-01T03:48:07Z
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score 10.845037