No Cover Image

Journal article 453 views

Azole Antifungal Sensitivity of Sterol 14α-Demethylase (CYP51) and CYP5218 from Malassezia globosa / Andrew Warrilow; Claire Price; Josie Parker; Nicola J. Rolley; Christopher J. Smyrniotis; David D. Hughes; Vera Thoss; W. David Nes; Diane Kelly; Theodore R. Holman; Steven Kelly

Scientific Reports, Volume: 6, Issue: 1

Swansea University Authors: Andrew, Warrilow, Claire, Price, Josie, Parker, Diane, Kelly, Steven, Kelly

Full text not available from this repository: check for access using links below.

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.1038/srep27690

Abstract

Malassezia species are known to play a role in several human skin diseases including dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, pityriasis versicolor and malassezia folliculitis and may also exacerbate atopic dermatitis and psoriasis even though they are members of the normal skin microbial flora, being prese...

Full description

Published in: Scientific Reports
ISSN: 2045-2322
Published: 2016
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa34335
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Malassezia species are known to play a role in several human skin diseases including dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, pityriasis versicolor and malassezia folliculitis and may also exacerbate atopic dermatitis and psoriasis even though they are members of the normal skin microbial flora, being present on the skin of 75 to 98% of healthy individuals. There are presently fourteen recognized species of Malassezia, eight of which are associated with humans. Malassezia are unique amongst fungi in requiring exogenous lipids for growth. We have investigated Malassezia globosa cytochromes P450 CYP51 and CYP5218 as sterol 14α-demethylase (the target of azole antifungals) and a putative fatty acid metabolism protein (and a potential azole drug target), respectively. MIC100 studies showed itraconazole should be considered as an alternative to ketoconazole given the potency and safety profiles and the CYP51 assay system can be used in structure-activity studies in drug development.
College: Swansea University Medical School
Issue: 1