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Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 444 views 14 downloads

The Response of, and on, Twitter to the Release of Dabiq Issue 15 / Stuart, Macdonald

Swansea University Author: Stuart, Macdonald

Abstract

On 31 July 2016 so-called Islamic State (IS) released issue 15 of their online English-language magazine Dabiq. In the 24 days that followed a total of 11,586 distinct accounts posted tweets/retweets mentioning the new issue. Using a bespoke platform, the researchers collected details of all these a...

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Published: Europol Headquarters, The Hague 1st European Counter Terrorism Centre Advisory Group Conference 2017
Online Access: https://www.europol.europa.eu/publications-documents/response-of-and-twitter-to-release-of-dabiq-issue-15
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa34344
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spelling 2019-02-04T19:45:10.1137153 v2 34344 2017-06-14 The Response of, and on, Twitter to the Release of Dabiq Issue 15 933e714a4cc37c3ac12d4edc277f8f98 0000-0002-7483-9023 Stuart Macdonald Stuart Macdonald true false 2017-06-14 LAWD On 31 July 2016 so-called Islamic State (IS) released issue 15 of their online English-language magazine Dabiq. In the 24 days that followed a total of 11,586 distinct accounts posted tweets/retweets mentioning the new issue. Using a bespoke platform, the researchers collected details of all these accounts (e.g., profile text, date account was created, language in which it was registered), as well as the first tweet each account posted that mentioned Dabiq issue 15 (including whether it was a plain tweet, directed tweet or retweet, and whether it contained an external link). This paper focuses on two sets of findings. First, it examines the 573 accounts that were suspended during the data collection period. It will be shown that the vast majority of these accounts were set up shortly before the new issue’s release and expressed support for either Dabiq or IS more generally. Second, it examines the 3,271 accounts whose first post contained original content (i.e., was not merely a retweet). Whilst the predominant tone was critical, many of these tweets (n=1621) contained external links, either to the magazine itself or to news items covering its release. Putting these two sets of findings together, the paper concludes by identifying challenges facing efforts to suppress online terrorist propaganda. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 1st European Counter Terrorism Centre Advisory Group Conference Europol Headquarters, The Hague Terrorism, propaganda, Twitter, internet 14 6 2017 2017-06-14 https://www.europol.europa.eu/publications-documents/response-of-and-twitter-to-release-of-dabiq-issue-15 COLLEGE NANME Legal Studies COLLEGE CODE LAWD Swansea University 2019-02-04T19:45:10.1137153 2017-06-14T20:40:34.1111571 Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law Law Stuart Macdonald 0000-0002-7483-9023 1 David Mair 2 Daniel Grinnell 3 0034344-14062017204435.pdf EUROPOL.pdf 2017-06-14T20:44:35.2900000 Output 1126147 application/pdf Version of Record true 2017-06-14T00:00:00.0000000 No permission to release this PDF true eng
title The Response of, and on, Twitter to the Release of Dabiq Issue 15
spellingShingle The Response of, and on, Twitter to the Release of Dabiq Issue 15
Stuart, Macdonald
title_short The Response of, and on, Twitter to the Release of Dabiq Issue 15
title_full The Response of, and on, Twitter to the Release of Dabiq Issue 15
title_fullStr The Response of, and on, Twitter to the Release of Dabiq Issue 15
title_full_unstemmed The Response of, and on, Twitter to the Release of Dabiq Issue 15
title_sort The Response of, and on, Twitter to the Release of Dabiq Issue 15
author_id_str_mv 933e714a4cc37c3ac12d4edc277f8f98
author_id_fullname_str_mv 933e714a4cc37c3ac12d4edc277f8f98_***_Stuart, Macdonald
author Stuart, Macdonald
format Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
publisher 1st European Counter Terrorism Centre Advisory Group Conference
college_str Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
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hierarchy_top_id hillaryrodhamclintonschooloflaw
hierarchy_top_title Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
hierarchy_parent_id hillaryrodhamclintonschooloflaw
hierarchy_parent_title Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
department_str Law{{{_:::_}}}Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law{{{_:::_}}}Law
url https://www.europol.europa.eu/publications-documents/response-of-and-twitter-to-release-of-dabiq-issue-15
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description On 31 July 2016 so-called Islamic State (IS) released issue 15 of their online English-language magazine Dabiq. In the 24 days that followed a total of 11,586 distinct accounts posted tweets/retweets mentioning the new issue. Using a bespoke platform, the researchers collected details of all these accounts (e.g., profile text, date account was created, language in which it was registered), as well as the first tweet each account posted that mentioned Dabiq issue 15 (including whether it was a plain tweet, directed tweet or retweet, and whether it contained an external link). This paper focuses on two sets of findings. First, it examines the 573 accounts that were suspended during the data collection period. It will be shown that the vast majority of these accounts were set up shortly before the new issue’s release and expressed support for either Dabiq or IS more generally. Second, it examines the 3,271 accounts whose first post contained original content (i.e., was not merely a retweet). Whilst the predominant tone was critical, many of these tweets (n=1621) contained external links, either to the magazine itself or to news items covering its release. Putting these two sets of findings together, the paper concludes by identifying challenges facing efforts to suppress online terrorist propaganda.
published_date 2017-06-14T03:56:02Z
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