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Interspecific visual signalling in animals and plants: a functional classification / Tim Caro, William Allen

Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Volume: 372, Issue: 1724, Start page: 20160344

Swansea University Author: William Allen

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DOI (Published version): 10.1098/rstb.2016.0344

Abstract

Organisms frequently gain advantages when they engage in signalling with individuals of other species. Here we provide a functionally structured framework of the great variety of interspecific visual signals seen in nature, then describe the different signalling mechanisms that have evolved in respo...

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Published in: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
ISSN: 0962-8436 1471-2970
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa34384
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first_indexed 2017-06-20T14:15:45Z
last_indexed 2018-02-09T05:24:26Z
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spelling 2017-07-28T11:39:51.6562096 v2 34384 2017-06-20 Interspecific visual signalling in animals and plants: a functional classification d6f01dd06d25fa8804daad86e251b8a5 0000-0003-2654-0438 William Allen William Allen true false 2017-06-20 SBI Organisms frequently gain advantages when they engage in signalling with individuals of other species. Here we provide a functionally structured framework of the great variety of interspecific visual signals seen in nature, then describe the different signalling mechanisms that have evolved in response to each of these functional requirements. We propose that interspecific visual signalling can be divided into six major functional categories: antipredator, food acquisition, antiparasite, host acquisition, reproductive, and agonistic signalling, with each function enabled by several distinct mechanisms. We support our classification by reviewing the ecological and behavioural drivers of interspecific signalling in animals and plants, principally focussing on comparative studies that address large-scale patterns of diversity. Collating diverse examples of interspecific signalling into an organised set of functional and mechanistic categories places anachronistic behavioural and morphological labels in fresh context, clarifies terminology, and redirects research effort towards understanding environmental influences driving interspecific signalling in nature. Journal Article Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 372 1724 20160344 0962-8436 1471-2970 5 7 2017 2017-07-05 10.1098/rstb.2016.0344 http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/372/1724/20160344 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2017-07-28T11:39:51.6562096 2017-06-20T10:58:27.8710610 College of Science Biosciences Tim Caro 1 William Allen 0000-0003-2654-0438 2 0034384-20062017110729.pdf Caro_Allen_Interspecific_Signals.pdf 2017-06-20T11:07:29.7900000 Output 489478 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2017-06-20T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Interspecific visual signalling in animals and plants: a functional classification
spellingShingle Interspecific visual signalling in animals and plants: a functional classification
William, Allen
title_short Interspecific visual signalling in animals and plants: a functional classification
title_full Interspecific visual signalling in animals and plants: a functional classification
title_fullStr Interspecific visual signalling in animals and plants: a functional classification
title_full_unstemmed Interspecific visual signalling in animals and plants: a functional classification
title_sort Interspecific visual signalling in animals and plants: a functional classification
author_id_str_mv d6f01dd06d25fa8804daad86e251b8a5
author_id_fullname_str_mv d6f01dd06d25fa8804daad86e251b8a5_***_William, Allen
author William, Allen
author2 Tim Caro
William Allen
format Journal article
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institution Swansea University
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url http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/372/1724/20160344
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description Organisms frequently gain advantages when they engage in signalling with individuals of other species. Here we provide a functionally structured framework of the great variety of interspecific visual signals seen in nature, then describe the different signalling mechanisms that have evolved in response to each of these functional requirements. We propose that interspecific visual signalling can be divided into six major functional categories: antipredator, food acquisition, antiparasite, host acquisition, reproductive, and agonistic signalling, with each function enabled by several distinct mechanisms. We support our classification by reviewing the ecological and behavioural drivers of interspecific signalling in animals and plants, principally focussing on comparative studies that address large-scale patterns of diversity. Collating diverse examples of interspecific signalling into an organised set of functional and mechanistic categories places anachronistic behavioural and morphological labels in fresh context, clarifies terminology, and redirects research effort towards understanding environmental influences driving interspecific signalling in nature.
published_date 2017-07-05T03:53:25Z
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