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In situ imaging of corrosion processes in nuclear fuel cladding / Alice Laferrere; Robert Burrows; Carol Glover; Ronald Nuuchin Clark; Oliver Payton; Loren Picco; Stacy Moore; Geraint Williams

Corrosion Engineering, Science and Technology, Volume: 52, Issue: 8, Pages: 596 - 604

Swansea University Authors: Carol, Glover, Geraint, Williams

Abstract

Spent nuclear fuel in the U.K. is stored within ponds dosed with NaOH in order to inhibit corrosion and, to ensure the efficiency of storage regimes, there is a need to define and quantify the corrosion processes involved during immersion of fuel cladding. In this project, state-of-the-art character...

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Published in: Corrosion Engineering, Science and Technology
ISSN: 1478-422X 1743-2782
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa34526
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Abstract: Spent nuclear fuel in the U.K. is stored within ponds dosed with NaOH in order to inhibit corrosion and, to ensure the efficiency of storage regimes, there is a need to define and quantify the corrosion processes involved during immersion of fuel cladding. In this project, state-of-the-art characterisation techniques were employed to image the corroding surfaces of two nuclear fuel cladding materials: stainless steel and Magnox. Advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel cladding consists of 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stabilised stainless steel and during irradiation the microstructure of the cladding undergoes significant changes, including grain boundary element depletion and segregation. High-speed atomic force microscopy with nanoscale resolution, enabled precipitates and pit initiation in stainless steel to be imaged. Magnox is a magnesium–aluminium alloy and during irradiation in a reactor the outer metal surface oxidises, forming an adherent passive layer which subsequently hydrates when exposed to water. Corrosion processes encompass breakdown of passivity and filiform-like corrosion, both of which were imaged in situ using the scanning vibrating electrode technique.
Keywords: Nuclear, filiform corrosion, intergranular corrosion, stainless steel, Magnox, advanced gas-cooled reactor, high-speed atomic force microscopy, scanning vibrating electrode
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 8
Start Page: 596
End Page: 604