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The Experiences of Being a Talented Youth Athlete: Lessons for Parents / Sam Elliott; Murray J. N. Drummond; Camilla Knight

Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, Pages: 1 - 19

Swansea University Author: Camilla, Knight

Abstract

Involvement in organized sport can be highly demanding for young athletes who encounter many difficult situations and stressors. This can be exacerbated among youth athletes who have been recruited into talent-identification youth sport programs. Given that there are a range of negative consequences...

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Published in: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology
ISSN: 1041-3200 1533-1571
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa35302
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first_indexed 2017-09-18T13:02:51Z
last_indexed 2018-02-09T05:26:19Z
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spelling 2017-10-30T09:28:12.0596134 v2 35302 2017-09-18 The Experiences of Being a Talented Youth Athlete: Lessons for Parents 6c81176f7e92c7c04ff6cfb8f1a0ed60 0000-0001-5806-6887 Camilla Knight Camilla Knight true false 2017-09-18 STSC Involvement in organized sport can be highly demanding for young athletes who encounter many difficult situations and stressors. This can be exacerbated among youth athletes who have been recruited into talent-identification youth sport programs. Given that there are a range of negative consequences that can result when talent-identified (TI) youth athletes are unable to cope with the stressors they encounter, additional support is therefore necessary. Parents are uniquely situated to assist in this regard, but they are not always equipped to provide optimal levels of support. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand the experiences of being a TI youth athlete and present the findings as “lessons” for parents seeking to enhance their involvement in TI youth sport settings. This article reports on qualitative data collected from the 1st year of a 3-year longitudinal study involving TI youth athletes from South Australia. Fifty male athletes (M age = 14.6 years) participated in focus groups to hear their experiences of being a TI youth athlete and understand what difficulties they want their parents to know. From the thematic analysis, 3 major themes were identified from the focus groups with TI youth athletes: (a) difficulties with being talented, (b) negotiating the future, and (c) playing for improvement. From the findings, a number of lessons for parents and youth sport organizations are offered to assist the transmission of knowledge to an applied setting. Journal Article Journal of Applied Sport Psychology 1 19 1041-3200 1533-1571 31 12 2017 2017-12-31 10.1080/10413200.2017.1382019 COLLEGE NANME Sports Science COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2017-10-30T09:28:12.0596134 2017-09-18T09:02:03.9928503 College of Engineering Engineering Sam Elliott 1 Murray J. N. Drummond 2 Camilla Knight 0000-0001-5806-6887 3 0035302-18092017090342.pdf elliott2017.pdf 2017-09-18T09:03:42.0730000 Output 573154 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2018-09-21T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title The Experiences of Being a Talented Youth Athlete: Lessons for Parents
spellingShingle The Experiences of Being a Talented Youth Athlete: Lessons for Parents
Camilla, Knight
title_short The Experiences of Being a Talented Youth Athlete: Lessons for Parents
title_full The Experiences of Being a Talented Youth Athlete: Lessons for Parents
title_fullStr The Experiences of Being a Talented Youth Athlete: Lessons for Parents
title_full_unstemmed The Experiences of Being a Talented Youth Athlete: Lessons for Parents
title_sort The Experiences of Being a Talented Youth Athlete: Lessons for Parents
author_id_str_mv 6c81176f7e92c7c04ff6cfb8f1a0ed60
author_id_fullname_str_mv 6c81176f7e92c7c04ff6cfb8f1a0ed60_***_Camilla, Knight
author Camilla, Knight
author2 Sam Elliott
Murray J. N. Drummond
Camilla Knight
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Applied Sport Psychology
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publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 1041-3200
1533-1571
doi_str_mv 10.1080/10413200.2017.1382019
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
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description Involvement in organized sport can be highly demanding for young athletes who encounter many difficult situations and stressors. This can be exacerbated among youth athletes who have been recruited into talent-identification youth sport programs. Given that there are a range of negative consequences that can result when talent-identified (TI) youth athletes are unable to cope with the stressors they encounter, additional support is therefore necessary. Parents are uniquely situated to assist in this regard, but they are not always equipped to provide optimal levels of support. Therefore, the aim of this study was to understand the experiences of being a TI youth athlete and present the findings as “lessons” for parents seeking to enhance their involvement in TI youth sport settings. This article reports on qualitative data collected from the 1st year of a 3-year longitudinal study involving TI youth athletes from South Australia. Fifty male athletes (M age = 14.6 years) participated in focus groups to hear their experiences of being a TI youth athlete and understand what difficulties they want their parents to know. From the thematic analysis, 3 major themes were identified from the focus groups with TI youth athletes: (a) difficulties with being talented, (b) negotiating the future, and (c) playing for improvement. From the findings, a number of lessons for parents and youth sport organizations are offered to assist the transmission of knowledge to an applied setting.
published_date 2017-12-31T03:54:25Z
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