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No Acute Effect of Reduced-exertion High-intensity Interval Training (REHIT) on Insulin Sensitivity / R. Metcalfe; S. Fawkner; N. Vollaard; Richard Metcalfe

International Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume: 37, Issue: 05, Pages: 354 - 358

Swansea University Author: Richard, Metcalfe

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DOI (Published version): 10.1055/s-0035-1564258

Abstract

We have previously demonstrated that reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT), requiring a maximum of two 20-s all-out cycling sprints in a 10-min exercise session, improves insulin sensitivity in sedentary men over a 6-week training intervention. However, the acute effects of REHIT...

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Published in: International Journal of Sports Medicine
ISSN: 0172-4622 1439-3964
Published: 2016
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa35655
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spelling 2017-10-04T09:38:09.3886368 v2 35655 2017-09-26 No Acute Effect of Reduced-exertion High-intensity Interval Training (REHIT) on Insulin Sensitivity 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf 0000-0003-0980-2977 Richard Metcalfe Richard Metcalfe true false 2017-09-26 STSC We have previously demonstrated that reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT), requiring a maximum of two 20-s all-out cycling sprints in a 10-min exercise session, improves insulin sensitivity in sedentary men over a 6-week training intervention. However, the acute effects of REHIT on insulin sensitivity have not previously been described. In this study 14 men and women (mean±SD age: 23±5 years; BMI 22.7±4.7 kg·m−2; +˙VO2max: 37.4±8.6 mL·kg−1·min−1) underwent oral glucose tolerance testing 14–16 h after an acute bout of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (2×20-s all-out sprints; REHIT), moderate-vigorous aerobic exercise (45 min at ~75% VO2max; AER), and a resting control condition (REST). Neither REHIT nor AER was associated with significant changes in glucose AUC (REHIT 609±98 vs. AER 651±85 vs. REST 641±126 mmol·l−1·120 min), insulin AUC (REHIT 30.9±15.4 vs. AER 31.4±13.0 vs. REST 35.0±18.5 nmol·l−1·120 min) or insulin sensitivity estimated by the Cederholm index (REHIT 86±20 vs. AER 79±13 vs. REST 82±24 mg·l2·mmol−1·mU−1·min−1). These data suggest that improvements in insulin sensitivity following a chronic REHIT intervention are the result of training adaptations rather than acute effects of the last exercise session. Journal Article International Journal of Sports Medicine 37 05 354 358 0172-4622 1439-3964 high-intensity interval training, acute exercise, insulin sensitivity, sprint interval training, glucose tolerance, time efficient 1 5 2016 2016-05-01 10.1055/s-0035-1564258 https://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0035-1564258 COLLEGE NANME Sports Science COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2017-10-04T09:38:09.3886368 2017-09-26T13:17:24.7248582 College of Engineering Engineering R. Metcalfe 1 S. Fawkner 2 N. Vollaard 3 Richard Metcalfe 0000-0003-0980-2977 4 0035655-29092017095052.pdf Metcalfeetal2015IJSMaccepted.pdf 2017-09-29T09:50:52.2530000 Output 164357 application/pdf Author's Original true 2017-09-29T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title No Acute Effect of Reduced-exertion High-intensity Interval Training (REHIT) on Insulin Sensitivity
spellingShingle No Acute Effect of Reduced-exertion High-intensity Interval Training (REHIT) on Insulin Sensitivity
Richard, Metcalfe
title_short No Acute Effect of Reduced-exertion High-intensity Interval Training (REHIT) on Insulin Sensitivity
title_full No Acute Effect of Reduced-exertion High-intensity Interval Training (REHIT) on Insulin Sensitivity
title_fullStr No Acute Effect of Reduced-exertion High-intensity Interval Training (REHIT) on Insulin Sensitivity
title_full_unstemmed No Acute Effect of Reduced-exertion High-intensity Interval Training (REHIT) on Insulin Sensitivity
title_sort No Acute Effect of Reduced-exertion High-intensity Interval Training (REHIT) on Insulin Sensitivity
author_id_str_mv 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf_***_Richard, Metcalfe
author Richard, Metcalfe
author2 R. Metcalfe
S. Fawkner
N. Vollaard
Richard Metcalfe
format Journal article
container_title International Journal of Sports Medicine
container_volume 37
container_issue 05
container_start_page 354
publishDate 2016
institution Swansea University
issn 0172-4622
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college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
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url https://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0035-1564258
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description We have previously demonstrated that reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (REHIT), requiring a maximum of two 20-s all-out cycling sprints in a 10-min exercise session, improves insulin sensitivity in sedentary men over a 6-week training intervention. However, the acute effects of REHIT on insulin sensitivity have not previously been described. In this study 14 men and women (mean±SD age: 23±5 years; BMI 22.7±4.7 kg·m−2; +˙VO2max: 37.4±8.6 mL·kg−1·min−1) underwent oral glucose tolerance testing 14–16 h after an acute bout of reduced-exertion high-intensity interval training (2×20-s all-out sprints; REHIT), moderate-vigorous aerobic exercise (45 min at ~75% VO2max; AER), and a resting control condition (REST). Neither REHIT nor AER was associated with significant changes in glucose AUC (REHIT 609±98 vs. AER 651±85 vs. REST 641±126 mmol·l−1·120 min), insulin AUC (REHIT 30.9±15.4 vs. AER 31.4±13.0 vs. REST 35.0±18.5 nmol·l−1·120 min) or insulin sensitivity estimated by the Cederholm index (REHIT 86±20 vs. AER 79±13 vs. REST 82±24 mg·l2·mmol−1·mU−1·min−1). These data suggest that improvements in insulin sensitivity following a chronic REHIT intervention are the result of training adaptations rather than acute effects of the last exercise session.
published_date 2016-05-01T03:53:46Z
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