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Interrelated chemical-microstructural-nanomechanical variations in the structural units of the cuttlebone of Sepia officinalis

L. North, D. Labonte, M. L. Oyen, M. P. Coleman, H. B. Caliskan, R. E. Johnston, Mark Coleman Orcid Logo, Richard Johnston Orcid Logo

APL Materials, Volume: 5, Issue: 11, Start page: 116103

Swansea University Authors: Mark Coleman , Richard Johnston

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DOI (Published version): 10.1063/1.4993202

Abstract

“Cuttlebone,” the internalized shell found in all members of the cephalopod family Sepiidae, is a sophisticated buoyancy device combining high porosity with considerable strength. Using a complementary suite of characterization tools, we identified significant structural, chemical, and mechanical va...

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Published in: APL Materials
ISSN: 2166-532X 2166-532X
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa36123
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Using a complementary suite of characterization tools, we identified significant structural, chemical, and mechanical variations across the different structural units of the cuttlebone: the dorsal shield consists of two stiff and hard layers with prismatic mineral organization which encapsulate a more ductile and compliant layer with a lamellar structure, enriched with organic matter. A similar organization is found in the chambers, which are separated by septa, and supported by meandering plates (&#x201C;pillars&#x201D;). Like the dorsal shield, septa contain two layers with lamellar and prismatic organization, respectively, which differ significantly in their mechanical properties: layers with prismatic organization are a factor of three stiffer and up to a factor of ten harder than those with lamellar organization. The combination of stiff and hard, and compliant and ductile components may serve to reduce the risk of catastrophic failure, and reflect the role of organic matter for the growth process of the cuttlebone. Mechanically &#x201C;weaker&#x201D; units may function as sacrificial structures, ensuring a stepwise failure of the individual chambers in cases of overloading, allowing the animals to retain near-neutral buoyancy even with partially damaged cuttlebones. Our findings have implications for our understanding of the structure-property-function relationship of cuttlebone, and may help to identify novel bioinspired design strategies for light-weight yet high-strength foams.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>APL Materials</journal><volume>5</volume><journalNumber>11</journalNumber><paginationStart>116103</paginationStart><publisher/><issnPrint>2166-532X</issnPrint><issnElectronic>2166-532X</issnElectronic><keywords>Anatomy, Failure analysis, Ductility, Membrane biochemistry, Garnet</keywords><publishedDay>31</publishedDay><publishedMonth>12</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2017</publishedYear><publishedDate>2017-12-31</publishedDate><doi>10.1063/1.4993202</doi><url/><notes>A collaborative research project led by Dr Johnston at Swansea University, working with a world leading nanomechanical group at Cambridge University led by Dr Oyen. The findings identify complex structure/property relationships within the structural component of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis. We also reveal a potential crack-arresting mechanism in this biomaterial. Cuttlebone is researched as a potential scaffold material in regenerative medicine, therefore the findings contribute to the improved understanding of its use in the human body. The XPM (Accelerated property mapping) technique used at Swansea is the first published example of its use. Project partners Carl Zeiss and Bruker.</notes><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Materials Science and Engineering</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>MTLS</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><degreesponsorsfunders>RCUK, EP/M028267/1</degreesponsorsfunders><apcterm/><lastEdited>2020-07-14T12:20:32.7079514</lastEdited><Created>2017-10-17T13:47:02.5091020</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Engineering</level></path><authors><author><firstname>L.</firstname><surname>North</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>D.</firstname><surname>Labonte</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>M. L.</firstname><surname>Oyen</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>M. P.</firstname><surname>Coleman</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>H. B.</firstname><surname>Caliskan</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>R. 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spelling 2020-07-14T12:20:32.7079514 v2 36123 2017-10-17 Interrelated chemical-microstructural-nanomechanical variations in the structural units of the cuttlebone of Sepia officinalis 73c5735de19c8a70acb41ab788081b67 0000-0002-4628-1077 Mark Coleman Mark Coleman true false 23282e7acce87dd926b8a62ae410a393 0000-0003-1977-6418 Richard Johnston Richard Johnston true false 2017-10-17 MTLS “Cuttlebone,” the internalized shell found in all members of the cephalopod family Sepiidae, is a sophisticated buoyancy device combining high porosity with considerable strength. Using a complementary suite of characterization tools, we identified significant structural, chemical, and mechanical variations across the different structural units of the cuttlebone: the dorsal shield consists of two stiff and hard layers with prismatic mineral organization which encapsulate a more ductile and compliant layer with a lamellar structure, enriched with organic matter. A similar organization is found in the chambers, which are separated by septa, and supported by meandering plates (“pillars”). Like the dorsal shield, septa contain two layers with lamellar and prismatic organization, respectively, which differ significantly in their mechanical properties: layers with prismatic organization are a factor of three stiffer and up to a factor of ten harder than those with lamellar organization. The combination of stiff and hard, and compliant and ductile components may serve to reduce the risk of catastrophic failure, and reflect the role of organic matter for the growth process of the cuttlebone. Mechanically “weaker” units may function as sacrificial structures, ensuring a stepwise failure of the individual chambers in cases of overloading, allowing the animals to retain near-neutral buoyancy even with partially damaged cuttlebones. Our findings have implications for our understanding of the structure-property-function relationship of cuttlebone, and may help to identify novel bioinspired design strategies for light-weight yet high-strength foams. Journal Article APL Materials 5 11 116103 2166-532X 2166-532X Anatomy, Failure analysis, Ductility, Membrane biochemistry, Garnet 31 12 2017 2017-12-31 10.1063/1.4993202 A collaborative research project led by Dr Johnston at Swansea University, working with a world leading nanomechanical group at Cambridge University led by Dr Oyen. The findings identify complex structure/property relationships within the structural component of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis. We also reveal a potential crack-arresting mechanism in this biomaterial. Cuttlebone is researched as a potential scaffold material in regenerative medicine, therefore the findings contribute to the improved understanding of its use in the human body. The XPM (Accelerated property mapping) technique used at Swansea is the first published example of its use. Project partners Carl Zeiss and Bruker. COLLEGE NANME Materials Science and Engineering COLLEGE CODE MTLS Swansea University RCUK, EP/M028267/1 2020-07-14T12:20:32.7079514 2017-10-17T13:47:02.5091020 College of Engineering Engineering L. North 1 D. Labonte 2 M. L. Oyen 3 M. P. Coleman 4 H. B. Caliskan 5 R. E. Johnston 6 Mark Coleman 0000-0002-4628-1077 7 Richard Johnston 0000-0003-1977-6418 8 0036123-18012018102012.pdf APCCD77PL.pdf 2018-01-18T10:20:12.6700000 Output 5421252 application/pdf Version of Record true 2018-01-18T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 (CC BY) license. true eng
title Interrelated chemical-microstructural-nanomechanical variations in the structural units of the cuttlebone of Sepia officinalis
spellingShingle Interrelated chemical-microstructural-nanomechanical variations in the structural units of the cuttlebone of Sepia officinalis
Mark, Coleman
Richard, Johnston
title_short Interrelated chemical-microstructural-nanomechanical variations in the structural units of the cuttlebone of Sepia officinalis
title_full Interrelated chemical-microstructural-nanomechanical variations in the structural units of the cuttlebone of Sepia officinalis
title_fullStr Interrelated chemical-microstructural-nanomechanical variations in the structural units of the cuttlebone of Sepia officinalis
title_full_unstemmed Interrelated chemical-microstructural-nanomechanical variations in the structural units of the cuttlebone of Sepia officinalis
title_sort Interrelated chemical-microstructural-nanomechanical variations in the structural units of the cuttlebone of Sepia officinalis
author_id_str_mv 73c5735de19c8a70acb41ab788081b67
23282e7acce87dd926b8a62ae410a393
author_id_fullname_str_mv 73c5735de19c8a70acb41ab788081b67_***_Mark, Coleman
23282e7acce87dd926b8a62ae410a393_***_Richard, Johnston
author Mark, Coleman
Richard, Johnston
author2 L. North
D. Labonte
M. L. Oyen
M. P. Coleman
H. B. Caliskan
R. E. Johnston
Mark Coleman
Richard Johnston
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description “Cuttlebone,” the internalized shell found in all members of the cephalopod family Sepiidae, is a sophisticated buoyancy device combining high porosity with considerable strength. Using a complementary suite of characterization tools, we identified significant structural, chemical, and mechanical variations across the different structural units of the cuttlebone: the dorsal shield consists of two stiff and hard layers with prismatic mineral organization which encapsulate a more ductile and compliant layer with a lamellar structure, enriched with organic matter. A similar organization is found in the chambers, which are separated by septa, and supported by meandering plates (“pillars”). Like the dorsal shield, septa contain two layers with lamellar and prismatic organization, respectively, which differ significantly in their mechanical properties: layers with prismatic organization are a factor of three stiffer and up to a factor of ten harder than those with lamellar organization. The combination of stiff and hard, and compliant and ductile components may serve to reduce the risk of catastrophic failure, and reflect the role of organic matter for the growth process of the cuttlebone. Mechanically “weaker” units may function as sacrificial structures, ensuring a stepwise failure of the individual chambers in cases of overloading, allowing the animals to retain near-neutral buoyancy even with partially damaged cuttlebones. Our findings have implications for our understanding of the structure-property-function relationship of cuttlebone, and may help to identify novel bioinspired design strategies for light-weight yet high-strength foams.
published_date 2017-12-31T03:56:50Z
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