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Cardiorespiratory fitness testing and cardiovascular disease risk in male steelworkers / B. J. Gray; J. W. Stephens; S. P. Williams; C. A. Davies; D. Turner; R. M. Bracken; Richard Bracken

Occupational Medicine, Volume: 67, Issue: 1, Pages: 38 - 43

Swansea University Author: Richard, Bracken

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DOI (Published version): 10.1093/occmed/kqw131

Abstract

BackgroundThe workplace has been advocated as a setting to perform cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessments. These risk assessments usually focus on traditional risk factors rather than cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) despite established associations between CRF and CVD. The lack of guidance on...

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Published in: Occupational Medicine
ISSN: 1471-8405
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa36817
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Abstract: BackgroundThe workplace has been advocated as a setting to perform cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessments. These risk assessments usually focus on traditional risk factors rather than cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) despite established associations between CRF and CVD. The lack of guidance on interpreting health-related CRF values has been suggested as a barrier to utilizing CRF in practice.AimsTo assess the merits of CRF testing in the workplace and explore whether a CRF value identified male individuals above the recommended threshold for further clinical investigation.MethodsCross-sectional analysis of male steelworkers from Carmarthenshire, South Wales, UK who completed a workplace-based CVD risk assessment with an added CRF protocol based on heart rate responses (Chester Step Test). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was undertaken to explore the possibility of a CRF value to identify individuals at an increased 10-year risk of CVD (QRISK2 ≥ 10%).ResultsThere were 81 participants. ROC analysis revealed that a CRF level of 34.5ml/kg/min identified those individuals above the ≥10% QRISK2 threshold with the best sensitivity (0.800) and specificity (0.687) to discriminate against true- and false-positive rates. Further analysis revealed that individuals with either ‘Average’ or ‘Below Average’ CRF would be five times more likely to have a 10-year CVD risk above the ≥10% QRISK2 threshold than individuals with an ‘Excellent’ or ‘Good’ level of fitness [OR 5.10 (95% CI 1.60–16.3)].ConclusionsThis study suggests CRF assessments are a useful addition to a workplace CVD assessment and could identify male individuals at increased predicted risk of the condition.
Keywords: Cardiovascular diseases, coronary heart disease, exercise test, physical fitness, primary prevention, risk assessment, workplace health promotion.
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 1
Start Page: 38
End Page: 43