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Technologies, Education and Training to Improve Older Driver Behaviour / Charles Musselwhite

Transport, Travel and Later Life, Volume: 10, Pages: 171 - 195

Swansea University Author: Musselwhite, Charles

DOI (Published version): 10.1108/S2044-994120170000010007

Abstract

There are many cognitive training tests purporting to both measure older people’s cognitive performance, several of which come with associated training that are deemed to improve cognition. This chapter describes cognitive tests that have been claimed to be linked to driver behaviour, and that train...

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Published in: Transport, Travel and Later Life
Published: 2017
Online Access: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/S2044-994120170000010007
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa36844
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spelling 2018-05-15T13:32:35Z v2 36844 2017-11-20 Technologies, Education and Training to Improve Older Driver Behaviour Charles Musselwhite Charles Musselwhite true 0000-0002-4831-2092 false c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c 75beebc8067424cc969d67472c4466a7 InStp5CuNrzTiXll2RhycFI/4mL4zIy/GXDlPjHD2Zg= 2017-11-20 HIA There are many cognitive training tests purporting to both measure older people’s cognitive performance, several of which come with associated training that are deemed to improve cognition. This chapter describes cognitive tests that have been claimed to be linked to driver behaviour, and that training on them could improve driver behaviour. Of special interest are tests that could be completed at home on a computer, as it is suggested this could capture many individuals who are worried about attending a driver assessment centre and are not likely to be referred. Findings suggest that UFOV (Useful Field of View) Time Making Trail (A and B) and Dual N have research suggesting that training on them could improve driver performance for older drivers. However, the robustness of the research is debateable. There are also two physiological tests – a neck and shoulder and a general fitness test that also show promising results for improving driver performance. In addition, education and training is purported to improve driver behaviour, but although there is positive feedback from older people who attend and some short-term improvements, research on long-term improvements on driver behaviour are not yet evident. Overall, there are promising results from individual cognitive, physiological tests and from education and training suggesting that reflection on action and feedback from the task is important to improving driver performance but more research is needed. Chapter in book Transport, Travel and Later Life 10 171 195 Driver behaviour, technology, ageing, cognition, training, driver assessment 7 12 2017 2017-12-07 10.1108/S2044-994120170000010007 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/S2044-994120170000010007 College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing CHHS HIA Swansea University Centre for Innovative Ageing None 2018-05-15T13:32:35Z 2017-11-20T13:06:23Z College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing Charles Musselwhite 1 0036844-15052018133117.pdf 36844.pdf 2018-05-15T13:31:17Z Output 560186 application/pdf AM true Updated Copyright 15/05/2018 2017-11-20T00:00:00 true eng
title Technologies, Education and Training to Improve Older Driver Behaviour
spellingShingle Technologies, Education and Training to Improve Older Driver Behaviour
Musselwhite, Charles
title_short Technologies, Education and Training to Improve Older Driver Behaviour
title_full Technologies, Education and Training to Improve Older Driver Behaviour
title_fullStr Technologies, Education and Training to Improve Older Driver Behaviour
title_full_unstemmed Technologies, Education and Training to Improve Older Driver Behaviour
title_sort Technologies, Education and Training to Improve Older Driver Behaviour
author_id_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c
author_id_fullname_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c_***_Musselwhite, Charles
author Musselwhite, Charles
author2 Charles Musselwhite
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description There are many cognitive training tests purporting to both measure older people’s cognitive performance, several of which come with associated training that are deemed to improve cognition. This chapter describes cognitive tests that have been claimed to be linked to driver behaviour, and that training on them could improve driver behaviour. Of special interest are tests that could be completed at home on a computer, as it is suggested this could capture many individuals who are worried about attending a driver assessment centre and are not likely to be referred. Findings suggest that UFOV (Useful Field of View) Time Making Trail (A and B) and Dual N have research suggesting that training on them could improve driver performance for older drivers. However, the robustness of the research is debateable. There are also two physiological tests – a neck and shoulder and a general fitness test that also show promising results for improving driver performance. In addition, education and training is purported to improve driver behaviour, but although there is positive feedback from older people who attend and some short-term improvements, research on long-term improvements on driver behaviour are not yet evident. Overall, there are promising results from individual cognitive, physiological tests and from education and training suggesting that reflection on action and feedback from the task is important to improving driver performance but more research is needed.
published_date 2017-12-07T05:51:11Z
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