No Cover Image

Media 268 views

Assimilation and its Discontents: Wales in British Literature / Daniel, Williams

Swansea University Author: Daniel, Williams

Abstract

How have the ways in which Britishness been imagined and re-imagined in literature from a Welsh perspective? What is the relationship between Britishness and Welshness? How has that relationship been imagined in literature and culture? Beginning with Shakespeare and ending with Raymond Williams, Dan...

Full description

Published: 2017
Online Access: http://dase.laits.utexas.edu/media/bsls/mp3/100540331.mp3
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa36855
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2017-11-21T05:08:50Z
last_indexed 2018-02-09T05:29:37Z
id cronfa36855
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2017-11-20T23:52:59.6314829</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>36855</id><entry>2017-11-20</entry><title>Assimilation and its Discontents: Wales in British Literature</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>827c700e950aa7919de43dff2e494e85</sid><ORCID/><firstname>Daniel</firstname><surname>Williams</surname><name>Daniel Williams</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2017-11-20</date><deptcode>AELC</deptcode><abstract>How have the ways in which Britishness been imagined and re-imagined in literature from a Welsh perspective? What is the relationship between Britishness and Welshness? How has that relationship been imagined in literature and culture? Beginning with Shakespeare and ending with Raymond Williams, Daniel Williams will suggest that the Welsh have played a constitutive, if problematic, role in the making of Britishness.Recording of a lecture delivered to the British Studies Faculty, University of Texas at Austin.</abstract><type>Digital or visual media</type><journal></journal><volume></volume><journalNumber></journalNumber><paginationStart/><paginationEnd/><publisher/><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint/><issnElectronic/><keywords>Wales. Britain. Assimilation. Shakespeare. Matthew Arnold. George Eliot</keywords><publishedDay>24</publishedDay><publishedMonth>2</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2017</publishedYear><publishedDate>2017-02-24</publishedDate><doi/><url>http://dase.laits.utexas.edu/media/bsls/mp3/100540331.mp3</url><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>English Literature &amp; Creative Writing</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>AELC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><lastEdited>2017-11-20T23:52:59.6314829</lastEdited><Created>2017-11-20T23:52:59.6314829</Created><path><level id="1">College of Arts and Humanities</level><level id="2">English Literature and Creative Writing</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Daniel</firstname><surname>Williams</surname><orcid/><order>1</order></author></authors><documents/></rfc1807>
spelling 2017-11-20T23:52:59.6314829 v2 36855 2017-11-20 Assimilation and its Discontents: Wales in British Literature 827c700e950aa7919de43dff2e494e85 Daniel Williams Daniel Williams true false 2017-11-20 AELC How have the ways in which Britishness been imagined and re-imagined in literature from a Welsh perspective? What is the relationship between Britishness and Welshness? How has that relationship been imagined in literature and culture? Beginning with Shakespeare and ending with Raymond Williams, Daniel Williams will suggest that the Welsh have played a constitutive, if problematic, role in the making of Britishness.Recording of a lecture delivered to the British Studies Faculty, University of Texas at Austin. Digital or visual media Wales. Britain. Assimilation. Shakespeare. Matthew Arnold. George Eliot 24 2 2017 2017-02-24 http://dase.laits.utexas.edu/media/bsls/mp3/100540331.mp3 COLLEGE NANME English Literature & Creative Writing COLLEGE CODE AELC Swansea University 2017-11-20T23:52:59.6314829 2017-11-20T23:52:59.6314829 College of Arts and Humanities English Literature and Creative Writing Daniel Williams 1
title Assimilation and its Discontents: Wales in British Literature
spellingShingle Assimilation and its Discontents: Wales in British Literature
Daniel, Williams
title_short Assimilation and its Discontents: Wales in British Literature
title_full Assimilation and its Discontents: Wales in British Literature
title_fullStr Assimilation and its Discontents: Wales in British Literature
title_full_unstemmed Assimilation and its Discontents: Wales in British Literature
title_sort Assimilation and its Discontents: Wales in British Literature
author_id_str_mv 827c700e950aa7919de43dff2e494e85
author_id_fullname_str_mv 827c700e950aa7919de43dff2e494e85_***_Daniel, Williams
author Daniel, Williams
format Media
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
department_str English Literature and Creative Writing{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}English Literature and Creative Writing
url http://dase.laits.utexas.edu/media/bsls/mp3/100540331.mp3
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description How have the ways in which Britishness been imagined and re-imagined in literature from a Welsh perspective? What is the relationship between Britishness and Welshness? How has that relationship been imagined in literature and culture? Beginning with Shakespeare and ending with Raymond Williams, Daniel Williams will suggest that the Welsh have played a constitutive, if problematic, role in the making of Britishness.Recording of a lecture delivered to the British Studies Faculty, University of Texas at Austin.
published_date 2017-02-24T13:06:31Z
_version_ 1656162029838270464
score 10.877759