No Cover Image

Journal article 317 views 43 downloads

Evaluating Primary Blast Effects In Vitro / Niall J. Logan; Hari Arora; Claire A. Higgins

Journal of Visualized Experiments, Issue: 127

Swansea University Author: Hari, Arora

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.3791/55618

Abstract

Exposure to blast events can cause severe trauma to vital organs such as the lungs, ears, and brain. Understanding the mechanisms behind such blast-induced injuries is of great importance considering the recent trend towards the use of explosives in modern warfare and terrorist related incidents. To...

Full description

Published in: Journal of Visualized Experiments
ISSN: 1940-087X
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa37120
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Exposure to blast events can cause severe trauma to vital organs such as the lungs, ears, and brain. Understanding the mechanisms behind such blast-induced injuries is of great importance considering the recent trend towards the use of explosives in modern warfare and terrorist related incidents. To fully understand blast-induced injury, we must first be able to replicate such blast events in a controlled environment using a reproducible method. In this technique using shock tube equipment, shock waves at a range of pressures can be propagated over live cells grown in 2D, and markers of cell viability can be immediately analyzed using a redox indicator assay and the fluorescent imaging of live and dead cells. This method demonstrated that increasing the peak blast overpressure to 127 kPa can stimulate a significant drop in cell viability when compared to untreated controls. Test samples are not limited to adherent cells, but can include cell suspensions, whole-body and tissue samples, through minor modifications to the shock tube setup. Replicating the exact conditions that tissues and cells experience when exposed to a genuine blast event is difficult. Techniques such as the one presented in this article can help to define damage thresholds and identify the transcriptional and epigenetic changes within cells that arise from shock wave exposure.
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 127