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Inhibiting mevalonate pathway enzymes increases stromal cell resilience to a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin / Sholeem Griffin; Giulio Preta; Iain Martin Sheldon

Scientific Reports, Volume: 7, Issue: 1, Pages: 1 - 13

Swansea University Author: Sheldon, Martin

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Abstract

Animal health depends on the ability of immune cells to kill invading pathogens, and on the resilience of tissues to tolerate the presence of pathogens. Trueperella pyogenes causes tissue pathology in many mammals by secreting a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, pyolysin (PLO), which targets stromal...

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Published in: Scientific Reports
ISSN: 2045-2322
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa37344
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Abstract: Animal health depends on the ability of immune cells to kill invading pathogens, and on the resilience of tissues to tolerate the presence of pathogens. Trueperella pyogenes causes tissue pathology in many mammals by secreting a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, pyolysin (PLO), which targets stromal cells. Cellular cholesterol is derived from squalene, which is synthesized via the mevalonate pathway enzymes, including HMGCR, FDPS and FDFT1. The present study tested the hypothesis that inhibiting enzymes in the mevalonate pathway to reduce cellular cholesterol increases the resilience of stromal cells to PLO. We first verified that depleting cellular cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin increased the resilience of stromal cells to PLO. We then used siRNA to deplete mevalonate pathway enzyme gene expression, and used pharmaceutical inhibitors, atorvastatin, alendronate or zaragozic acid to inhibit the activity of HMGCR, FDPS and FDFT1, respectively. These approaches successfully reduced cellular cholesterol abundance, but mevalonate pathway enzymes did not affect cellular resilience equally. Inhibiting FDFT1 was most effective, with zaragozic acid reducing the impact of PLO on cell viability. The present study provides evidence that inhibiting FDFT1 increases stromal cell resilience to a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin.
Keywords: Cellular microbiology, Infection, Reproductive biology
College: Swansea University Medical School
Issue: 1
Start Page: 1
End Page: 13