No Cover Image

Journal article 485 views

“The potential for using colour profiling for UV graphic screen printing”

Eifion Jewell Orcid Logo, Timothy Claypole

Journal of the Technical association of the graphic arts,, Volume: 2, Issue: 2, Pages: 29 - 2006

Swansea University Author: Eifion Jewell Orcid Logo

Abstract

Colour management via ICC colour profiling potentially offers an opportunity for improved colour rendition for 4 colour screen printing. This is of particular importance as physical interactions between successive UV halftone dots results in considerable changes in the printed colour. With UV inks t...

Full description

Published in: Journal of the Technical association of the graphic arts,
Published: 2006
Online Access: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Magnus_Lestelius/publication/237533259_Flexo_Print_of_Corrugated_Board_Mechanical_Aspects_of_the_Plate_and_Plate_Mounting_Materials/links/0f317536ba9186d8c2000000/Flexo-Print-of-Corrugated-Board-Mechanical-Aspects-of-the-Plate-and-Plate-Mounting-Materials.pdf#page=35
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa37692
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Colour management via ICC colour profiling potentially offers an opportunity for improved colour rendition for 4 colour screen printing. This is of particular importance as physical interactions between successive UV halftone dots results in considerable changes in the printed colour. With UV inks the transfer of the second, third and fourth colours can result “stacking” (excess ink transfer) or “skipping” (insufficient ink transfer) leading to unsightly marks in the image and considerable deviations in colour.By addressing the relationship between the film area and the printed colour, instead of the traditional approach of film area to print area, the effect of these dot interactions can be limited, resulting in improved colour rendition. The aim of the investigation was to establish whether a generic profile for screen printing would be possible and to what extent the colour rendition was affected by squeegee hardness, squeegee pressure and substrate.In areas where only a single process colour was printed the printed colour was found to be independent of the squeegee pressure. However, the squeegee pressure had a dramatic effect in areas where more than one process colour was printed. The colour change due to squeegee pressure was most evident in areas which required three or more process colours to be printed. Considerable difference was evident between two manufacturers’ ink which was in part related to the difference in ink density achieved for two manufacturers process colours under the same conditions.Until standards for “press ready” ink densities are used then no generic profile exists for the screen printing process. As such, the use of ICC profiles requires each press & ink combination to be profiled in turn. Given standard ink densities and standard press conditions, problems still exist in generating a single profile since local ink density is strongly affected by local surface technology.The findings are also relevant to any multi layer printing process where the build of previous layers prevents the correct transfer of the ink to substrate, such as sensor and electronics printing.
Keywords: 4 colour screen printing, ICC profile
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 2
Start Page: 29
End Page: 2006