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The impact of residential immobility and population turnover on the support networks of older people living in rural areas: Evidence from CFAS Wales / Vanessa Burholt; Alexandra Vanta Sardani

Population, Space and Place, Volume: 24, Start page: e2132

Swansea University Author: Burholt, Vanessa

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DOI (Published version): 10.1002/psp.2132

Abstract

This article addresses two questions: Are ‘stayers’ - defined as older people who were born in an area and lived there for 25 years or more prior to interview – more likely to have locally integrated or family dependent networks than other types of networks in the 21st Century? Does population turno...

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Published in: Population, Space and Place
ISSN: 15448444
Published: Wiley 2018
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa38077
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Abstract: This article addresses two questions: Are ‘stayers’ - defined as older people who were born in an area and lived there for 25 years or more prior to interview – more likely to have locally integrated or family dependent networks than other types of networks in the 21st Century? Does population turnover influence the support networks of older people more strongly than being a ‘stayer’? A sample of 1,870 participants living in rural areas is drawn from cross-sectional (Wave 1) data (version 2) from The Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (CFAS Wales). Five multinomial logistic regression models are used to establish how demographic covariates, cumulative population turnover, inflow, outflow and ‘stayer’ influence membership of Family Dependent (FD), Locally Integrated (LI), Local-Self Contained (LSC), Wider Community Focused (WCF) and Private Restricted (PR) support networks. The results reveal significant differences in the distribution of network types between stayers and non-stayers. Stayers were more likely to have LI or FD networks and were less likely to have WCF or PR networks than non-stayers. Gender, marital status, education, disability, childlessness, area deprivation, and cumulative population turnover, inflow and outflow (by age group) also influence membership of different networks. The research has implications for planning of formal services in rural places characterised by ‘ageing in place’ or as ‘ageing places’ and comprising socially engaged and socially marginalized networks. In particular, providers of social care should take into account the different types of support that may be required to bolster socially marginalized support networks.
Keywords: ageing in place; ageing places; support networks; informal carers; older people; rural
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Start Page: e2132